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[https://wip.pubpub.org/collectivewisdom] - - public:weinreich
management, media, social_change, storytelling, target_audience - 5 | id:253344 -

Why co-create and why now? Collective Wisdom is a first-of-its-kind field study of the media industry, that maps works that live outside the limits of singular authorship. While the concept of co-creation is entering the zeitgeist, it is an ancient and under-reported dynamic. Media co-creation has particular relevance in the face of today’s myriad of challenges, such as the climate crisis and threats to democracy. But it is not without risks and complications. In this study we look at how people co-create within communities; across disciplines; and increasingly, with living systems and artificial intelligence (AI). We also synthesize the risks, as well as the practical lessons from the field on how to co-create with an ethos grounded in principles of equity and justice. This qualitative study reframes how culture is produced, and is a first step in articulating contemporary co-creative practices and ethics. In doing so, it connects unusual dots.

[https://medium.com/park-recommendations/conformity-the-power-of-social-influences-cass-sunstein-401c1a302465?sk=b4f5ad719eb1dcb519b4744d848fc467] - - public:weinreich
social_change, social_norms - 2 | id:251738 -

Especially striking was something that I was not surprised by but had never heard explained before: the idea that groups conform, but always in a specific direction. They always become more extreme. They never move towards the middle. Sunstein addresses the phenomenon by describing relevant research. He writes: The effect of group deliberation was to shift individual opinions toward extremism. Group “verdicts” on climate change, affirmative action, and same-sex unions were more extreme than the predeliberation average of group members. In addition, the anonymous views of individual members became more extreme, after deliberation, than were their anonymous views before they started to talk. We see this phenomenon everywhere, especially social media, but the simple principle of conformity by itself doesn’t explain it. If a group conforms over time, shouldn’t their new views converge on the original group mean? Wouldn’t people’s views be just as likely to become more moderate than more extreme? The answer, of course, is no. Why? Because someone with more extreme views is usually more outspoken or passionate about those views, and that looks to most people like confidence. And we tend to conform to the views of those who seem more confident. Maybe Facebook isn’t the best place to form our political opinions.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/really-best-way-start-meeting-steve-martin/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, management - 2 | id:251670 -

Whoever is in charge of hosting the meeting, or the most senior person in the room, should take responsibility for introducing everyone. Doing so neatly sidesteps both the aforesaid problems. Any awkwardness Claire in procurement feels about mentioning her experience and expertise in a relevant issue the meeting will address is deftly deflected. Second, the procurement department’s hi-flyer is now better placed to listen to the experience and expertise of others in the room, without worrying that her turn to speak is rapidly approaching.

[https://hbr.org/2019/05/improving-health-care-by-gamifying-it?utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Rejection+Kills+%5BBest+Reads%5D&utm_campaign=Weekly+Digest+%28May+19%29] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, gaming - 3 | id:251668 -

A central challenge for all health-related gamification programs is engaging participation, particularly among high-risk patients. Several design elements commonly found within gamified health and wellness programs could be made more engaging by incorporating behavioral insights.

[https://www.marketingweek.com/2019/05/13/the-real-impact-and-effectiveness-of-gillettes-metoo-ad/?ct_5cdbc4658b197=5cdbc4658b198] - - public:weinreich
branding, cause_marketing, sample_campaigns - 3 | id:251577 -

There are a few criteria which need to be met for strategic brand purpose work and stand a chance of delivering. The first is choosing a meaningful issue to address. The second is asking whether your brand can connect to the issue in a relevant and distinctive way? And finally, it must focus on an issue that your brand can do something significant about, rather than just ‘raising awareness’. ...While the new campaign might not have done much harm, at best, it is a waste of time and money. The content is off-character and therefore off-brand, it builds no memory structure, and has a negative effect on purchase intent.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/better-say-easier-less-difficult-bri-williams/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:251562 -

For customers or stakeholders who are prevention-minded, loss is boss. Speaking about the avoidance of negative consequences is powerful so use words and phrases like “gaps”, “missing out”, “waste”, and “avoid”. For customers or staff with a promotion-mindset, frame the gain. “Opportunity”, “growth”, “win” and “save” will be your go-to words.

[https://www.behavioraleconomics.com/the-three-laws-of-human-behavior/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, theory - 3 | id:251498 -

Like the physical properties of the universe, human behavior is complicated. And just as Newton’s Laws describe the motion of physical objects, these Laws of Human Behavior aim to provide a general model for how humans behave. People tend to stick to the status quo unless the forces of friction or fuel push us off of our path; behavior is a function of the person and their environment; every decision includes tradeoffs and the potential for unintended consequences.

[https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/studio/multimedia/20190423-how-change-happens-cass-sunstein] - - public:weinreich
social_change, social_norms - 2 | id:251496 -

"My little pitch is that a social movement worth celebrating doesn't only un-falsify people's preferences and unleash them to say what they actually think. It also casts a fresh light on the past. It doesn't just elicit preexisting judgement, it produces new ones."

[https://behavioralscientist.org/broadening-the-nature-of-behavioral-design/?fbclid=IwAR3Tt2zfeGS9feR3KCQgzIGTL5xHZfuUxuLNVN0Ufupq4y8xd-Qurf0qsso] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:245240 -

So what counts as the “right” kind of problem for behavioral science to solve? Put more bluntly: How might our sense about what we should solve, or even what qualifies as a problem worth solving, be biased by how we think about what we can solve?

[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322150387_A_Rose_by_Any_Other_Name_A_Subtle_Linguistic_Cue_Impacts_Anger_and_Corresponding_Policy_Support_in_Intractable_Conflict] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, policy - 3 | id:245239 -

Given the central role of anger in shaping adversarial policy preferences in the context of intergroup conflict, its reduction may promote conflict resolution. In the current work, we drew on psycholinguistic research on the role of language in generating emotions to explore a novel, extremely subtle means of intervention. Specifically, we hypothesized that phrasing conflict-relevant policies in noun form (vs. verb form) would reduce anger and impact policy support correspondingly. Results across three experimental studies in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict supported these expectations for both support for concessions (Studies 1–3) and retaliatory policies (Study 3), with reduction in anger mediating the salutary impact of noun form (vs. verb form) on policy support. These results expand our understanding of the influence of language on emotions and policies in the context of conflict and have applied relevance for conflict-resolution efforts. (1) (PDF) A Rose by Any Other Name? A Subtle Linguistic Cue Impacts Anger and Corresponding Policy Support in Intractable Conflict. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322150387_A_Rose_by_Any_Other_Name_A_Subtle_Linguistic_Cue_Impacts_Anger_and_Corresponding_Policy_Support_in_Intractable_Conflict [accessed May 02 2019].

[https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-019-0561-2.epdf?author_access_token=2t40_AInucFLuFXIQiVRLtRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0OzZpaMOGaVgMgMz7e_dc3fvIqaUiM0-nBokNPZYbezvPjKQePWHn8qFDjmmSoeVnTwua8GuVs_sk4IqXyyaB_zhTfM1nXnWCyMLgcXGA69Hg%3D%3D] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, graphic_design, theory - 3 | id:245238 -

Use of natural language to represent behaviour-change theories has resulted in lack of clarity and consistency, hindering com-parison, integration, development and use. This paper describes development of a formal system for representing behaviour-change theories that aims to improve clarity and consistency. A given theory is represented in terms of (1) its component constructs (for example, ‘self-efficacy’, ‘perceived threat’ or ‘subjective norm’), which are labelled and defined, and (2) rela-tionships between pairs of constructs, which may be causal, structural or semantic. This formalism appears adequate to rep-resent five commonly used theories (health belief model, information–motivation–behavioural skill model, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behaviour and the trans-theoretical model).

[https://behavioralscientist.org/behavioral-scientists-ethics-checklist/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, ethics, research - 3 | id:245235 -

To ensure these partnerships are beneficial to all involved—companies, employees, customers, and researchers­—behavioral scientists need a set of ethical standards for conducting research in companies. To address this need, we created The Behavioral Scientist’s Ethics Checklist. In the checklist, we outline six key principles and questions that behavioral scientists and companies should ask themselves before beginning their research. To illustrate how each principle operates in practice, we provide mini case studies highlighting the challenges other researchers and companies have faced.

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