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[https://wip.mitpress.mit.edu/collectivewisdom] - - public:weinreich
cgm, management, media, storytelling, strategy, target_audience - 6 | id:264205 -

Why co-create and why now? Collective Wisdom is a first-of-its-kind field study of the media industry, that maps works that live outside the limits of singular authorship. While the concept of co-creation is entering the zeitgeist, it is an ancient and under-reported dynamic. Media co-creation has particular relevance in the face of today’s myriad of challenges, such as the climate crisis and threats to democracy. But it is not without risks and complications. In this study we look at how people co-create within communities; across disciplines; and increasingly, with living systems and artificial intelligence (AI). We also synthesize the risks, as well as the practical lessons from the field on how to co-create with an ethos grounded in principles of equity and justice. This qualitative study reframes how culture is produced, and is a first step in articulating contemporary co-creative practices and ethics. In doing so, it connects unusual dots.

[https://thebehavioursagency.com/richard-shotton-behavioural-science-marketing/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, marketing, social_norms - 5 | id:255764 -

Consider three levels: literal, liberal & lateral. Example: social proof... Literal: share the percentage of people who follow the norm in general Liberal: tailor the claims to what “people like them“ do Lateral: suggest popularity rather than stating it

[https://www.jmmnews.com/understanding-how-and-why-people-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, quantitative, research, social_marketing, theory - 6 | id:254322 -

We applied a Hidden Markov Model* (see Figure 1) to examine how and why behaviours did or did not change. The longitudinal repeated measure design meant we knew about food waste behaviour at two points (the amount of food wasted before and after the program), changes in the amount of food wasted reported over time for each household (more or less food wasted) and other factors (e.g. self-efficacy). By using a new method we could extend our understanding beyond the overall effect (households in the Waste Not Want Not program group wasted less food after participating when compared to the control group).

[https://journal-bpa.org/index.php/jbpa/article/view/55] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, health_communication, social_norms - 3 | id:253695 -

The results suggest that there was no significant difference in compliance rates between treatment and control schools six months post-treatment. To our knowledge, it is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of descriptive social norms in increasing immunization compliance rates in a school-based setting. In addition, it serves as an example of embedding a behaviorally-informed experiment in a government program utilizing high-quality administrative data.

[https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-walking/yes-counting-steps-might-make-you-healthier-idUSKCN1TQ2P0] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, obesity, technology, theory - 5 | id:253687 -

“Tracking your daily activity with a pedometer, wearable, or smartphone is an important part of any physical activity program,” Patel said by email. “However, it should be combined with other behavior change strategies such as goal-setting, coaching, or social interventions to increase sustainability.”

[https://ai-hr.cyber.harvard.edu/primp-viz.html] - - public:weinreich
ethics, technology - 2 | id:253683 -

visualisation of all available AI principles. No need for new ones, but a need to operationalise & contextualise them across AI life cycle, for all stakeholders involved - data scientist, business execs, procurement & regulators

[https://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/media-and-resources/publications/co-design] - - public:weinreich
conference, design, how_to, management - 4 | id:253682 -

Co-design with young people is the act of co-creating alongside stakeholders and young people to ensure that the results of the design meet the needs of those young people. Here are four key resources for background information to co-design. Download this visualisation (PDF, 4.3 MB) to learn where co-design sits on the spectrum of approaches to program design Use this template (PDF, 13 MB) as a reminder for the five principles of co-design This article contains historical and modern case studies of co-design in action The Outer East Children and Youth Area Partnership Co-design [OECYAP] has created a detailed resource of the theoretical and practical workshop content by co-design expert, Ingrid Burkett

[https://medium.com/better-humans/cognitive-bias-cheat-sheet-55a472476b18] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, theory - 3 | id:253440 -

I started with the raw list of the 175 biases and added them all to a spreadsheet, then took another pass removing duplicates, and grouping similar biases (like bizarreness effect and humor effect) or complementary biases (like optimism bias and pessimism bias). The list came down to about 20 unique biased mental strategies that we use for very specific reasons. I made several different attempts to try to group these 20 or so at a higher level, and eventually landed on grouping them by the general mental problem that they were attempting to address. Every cognitive bias is there for a reason — primarily to save our brains time or energy. If you look at them by the problem they’re trying to solve, it becomes a lot easier to understand why they exist, how they’re useful, and the trade-offs (and resulting mental errors) that they introduce.

[https://www.sciencefocus.com/science/nudge-theory-ten-subtle-pushes-that-change-how-you-think/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy - 3 | id:253429 -

Nudges span an exceedingly wide range, and their number and variety are constantly growing. Here is a catalogue of ten important nudges — very possibly, the most important for purposes of policy — along with a few explanatory comments.

[https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3379367] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:253428 -

Consumers, employees, students, and others are often subjected to “sludge”: excessive or unjustified frictions, such as paperwork burdens, that cost time or money; that may make life difficult to navigate; that may be frustrating, stigmatizing, or humiliating; and that might end up depriving people of access to important goods, opportunities, and services. Because of behavioral biases and cognitive scarcity, sludge can have much more harmful effects than private and public institutions anticipate. To protect consumers, investors, employees, and others, firms, universities, and government agencies should regularly conduct Sludge Audits to catalogue the costs of sludge, and to decide when and how to reduce it. Much of human life is unnecessarily sludgy. Sludge often has costs far in excess of benefits, and it can have hurt the most vulnerable members of society.

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