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Viewing weinreich's Bookmarks


[https://peoplescience.maritz.com/Articles/2019/Its-Time-For-Consumer-Romance] - - public:weinreich
marketing, theory - 2 | id:265977 -

If marketers were all playing a fantasy nerd version of rock-paper-scissors, then “heart” would almost always beat “head.”

[http://www.comminit.com/health/content/formulas-prevention-narrative-versus-non-narrative-formats-comparative-analysis-their-ef] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, HIV_AIDS, storytelling - 3 | id:265973 -

The study found that the non-narrative (expository) profile produced a greater increase in knowledge, while the narrative profile led to greater change in more responsible preventive attitudes and behaviours.

[https://human-risk.com/the-first-rule-of-human-risk-is/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, management - 3 | id:265610 -

I’m often asked for my top tips for managing Human Risk. Over the next five weeks, I’m going to reveal the Five Rules of Human Risk, beginning, appropriately enough with the first: Rule 1: Human Risk can be managed but not eliminated On the face of it, this is a statement of the blindingly obvious. Yet it is fundamentally important; if we really want to manage Human Risk, then we need to accept that we can’t control every aspect of human decision-making. No matter how hard we try.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/when-and-why-defaults-influence-decisions-a-metaanalysis-of-default-effects/67AF6972CFB52698A60B6BD94B70C2C0] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, design, evaluation - 4 | id:265582 -

When people make decisions with a pre-selected choice option – a ‘default’ – they are more likely to select that option. Because defaults are easy to implement, they constitute one of the most widely employed tools in the choice architecture toolbox. However, to decide when defaults should be used instead of other choice architecture tools, policy-makers must know how effective defaults are and when and why their effectiveness varies. To answer these questions, we conduct a literature search and meta-analysis of the 58 default studies (pooled n = 73,675) that fit our criteria. While our analysis reveals a considerable influence of defaults (d = 0.68, 95% confidence interval = 0.53–0.83), we also discover substantial variation: the majority of default studies find positive effects, but several do not find a significant effect, and two even demonstrate negative effects. To explain this variability, we draw on existing theoretical frameworks to examine the drivers of disparity in effectiveness. Our analysis reveals two factors that partially account for the variability in defaults’ effectiveness. First, we find that defaults in consumer domains are more effective and in environmental domains are less effective. Second, we find that defaults are more effective when they operate through endorsement (defaults that are seen as conveying what the choice architect thinks the decision-maker should do) or endowment (defaults that are seen as reflecting the status quo). We end with a discussion of possible directions for a future research program on defaults, including potential additional moderators, and implications for policy-makers interested in the implementation and evaluation of defaults.

[https://dfedigital.blog.gov.uk/2019/07/18/transformation-is-not-a-programme/] - - public:weinreich
organization, social_change - 2 | id:264335 -

Transformation sounds impressive, glamorous even, but what does it actually mean? After six years of leading transformation in government, this is my attempt to explain what it is, what it’s not, and how to spot the difference. It’s always good to start with a definition, and Cambridge Dictionary offers this one: ‘transformation: a complete change in the appearance or character of something… especially so that thing is improved’. This gives us some clues, but it’s not nearly complete. So with the help of my Twitter community, here’s 6 characteristics of what transformation is, and what it is not.

[https://www.dw.com/en/social-media-analytics-a-practical-guidebook-for-journalists-and-other-media-professionals/a-49615889] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, how_to, media, research, social_media - 5 | id:264330 -

This guidebook helps media professionals of small media houses develop a better understanding of how to use data for improving their social media performance. Also includes worksheets and templates.

[http://www.chriscorrigan.com/parkinglot/facilitation-resources/] - - public:weinreich
conference, consulting, creativity, management, organization, professional_resource - 6 | id:264295 -

Here is a collection of resources I use in my facilitation practice. By and large these resources support facilitation of participatory and self-organizing process at scales ranging from very small groups to large conferences. I use some of these tools directly and others as inspirations to design and create my own processes. The first section provides links to participatory group process that are inclusive and self-organizing to varying degrees. The section on process architecture and maps contains links to sites whose worldviews can inform process design from single meetings to large scale change. The next three sections cover more specific tools useful for particular purposes, and finally the last section contains links to sources of ongoing inspiration.

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5789790/?fbclid=IwAR1HekVX1NeS8njx68dt0sYqca4GWRsK3fLeMkgRfrT-j17Q4Jjyuab0uYk] - - public:weinreich
campaign_effects, health_communication, theory - 3 | id:264291 -

Fear appeals are effective. The present meta-analysis found that fear appeals were successful at influencing attitudes, intentions, and behaviors across nearly all conditions that were analyzed. Even when a moderator was unrelated to fear appeal effectiveness, fear appeals were still more effective than comparison treatments. Further, there was not one level of any moderator that we tested for which fear appeals backfired to produce worse outcomes relative to the comparison groups.

[https://media-exp2.licdn.com/media-proxy/ext?w=720&h=1103&f=pj&hash=3%2Boo6xSgbdVhFCO6k0vmEyxhgeo%3D&ora=1%2CaFBCTXdkRmpGL2lvQUFBPQ%2CxAVta5g-0R6jnhodx1Ey9KGTqAGj6E5DQJHUA3L0CHH05IbfPWi8LJWJKuCjoUBDLCRTjQBgLry1EjblG465Loy5LI1xiMOxd5T5aRUPbhU4hGUB5sE-Pg&sh] - - public:weinreich
design, professional_resource, research - 3 | id:264286 -

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RwJbhkCA58&feature=youtu.be] - - public:weinreich
academia, conference, health_communication, professional_resource, research - 5 | id:264284 -

Version 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYk29tnxASs Every field in science uses the same, old, wall-of-text poster design. If we can improve the knowledge transfer efficiency of that design even by a little bit, it could have massive ripple effects on all of science. Also, poster sessions tend to suck, so here's my pitch to make them more efficient AND more fun with a new approach to designing scientific posters/academic posters that is both more usable, and easier to create!

[https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/the-real-reason-fans-hate-the-last-season-of-game-of-thrones/?fbclid=IwAR3FnkKdemRUGPcrdfwe7ZVZ5YiaKD17htpygt3KLiut5hdeaROvdonU2dg] - - public:weinreich
social_change, storytelling - 2 | id:264280 -

Benioff and Weiss steer the narrative lane away from the sociological and shifted to the psychological. That’s the main, and often only, way Hollywood and most television writers tell stories. This is an important shift to dissect because whether we tell our stories primarily from a sociological or psychological point of view has great consequences for how we deal with our world and the problems we encounter.

[https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/matt-loper-helping-patients-adhere-to-medication-plans/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, strategy - 3 | id:264278 -

Wellth does this by “giving” patients money at the start of each month to take their pills. To prove they’re on track, they use the Wellth app to take a photograph of their medicines in the palm of their hand. But every day that they miss, they are penalized in the form of fee, which nets them less money at the end of the month. This loss-contract model is gaining notoriety and it should be: Wellth discovered that positive incentives accounted for adherence rates around 60% while loss-contract models account for better than 90% adherence rates.

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