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[https://behavioralscientist.org/dan-heath-iceland-drinking-to-solve-problems-before-they-happen-you-need-to-unite-the-right-people-upstream/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, product, sample_campaigns, social_marketing, social_norms, substance_abuse, youth - 8 | id:1276590 -

Iceland went from 42% of its 15 and 16 year olds having been drunk in the past month in 1998 to only 5% in 2018. This change is a great case study in offering alternative behaviors and shifting social norms on a national scale.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/MKY9UV9TYQ852WG7XAAQ/full] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:1257927 -

Why people do or do not change their beliefs has been a long-standing puzzle. Sometimes people hold onto false beliefs despite ample contradictory evidence; sometimes they change their beliefs without sufficient reason. Here, we propose that the utility of a belief is derived from the potential outcomes associated with holding it. Outcomes can be internal (e.g., positive/negative feelings) or external (e.g., material gain/loss), and only some are dependent on belief accuracy. Belief change can then be understood as an economic transaction in which the multidimensional utility of the old belief is compared against that of the new belief. Change will occur when potential outcomes alter across attributes, for example because of changing environments or when certain outcomes are made more or less salient.

[https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/15/9129/htm] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, social_media, technology - 4 | id:1257483 -

Digital media are omnipresent in modern life, but the science on the impact of digital media on behavior is still in its infancy. There is an emerging evidence base of how to use digital media for behavior change. Strategies to change behavior implemented using digital technology have included a variety of platforms and program strategies, all of which are potentially more effective with increased frequency, intensity, interactivity, and feedback. It is critical to accelerate the pace of research on digital platforms, including social media, to understand and address its effects on human behavior. The purpose of the current paper is to provide an overview and describe methods in this emerging field, present use cases, describe a future agenda, and raise central questions to be addressed in future digital health research for behavior change. Digital media for behavior change employs three main methods: (1) digital media interventions, (2) formative research using digital media, and (3) digital media used to conduct evaluations. We examine use cases across several content areas including healthy weight management, tobacco control, and vaccination uptake, to describe and illustrate the methods and potential impact of this emerging field of study. In the discussion, we note that digital media interventions need to explore the full range of functionality of digital devices and their near-constant role in personal self-management and day-to-day living to maximize opportunities for behavior change. Future experimental research should rigorously examine the effects of variable levels of engagement with, and frequency and intensity of exposure to, multiple forms of digital media for behavior change.

[https://theresearchagency.com/mainframe/human-behaviour/one-time-actions-regular-routine-guide-strengthening-habits] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, how_to, strategy, theory - 4 | id:1257482 -

TRA has added a layer of thinking to the well-established habit loop – can we think beyond push notifications for cues and think beyond a discount as a reward? We analysed five different habit models and over 60 case studies in order to understand the breadth and depth of cues and rewards. Our framework takes these learnings and provides a thorough checklist for the cue, the behaviour and reward for strengthening habits. When you’re working on strengthening a one-time behaviour into a routine habit, consider the various options for each stage.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1745691621995183?M_BT=32288105572539&fbclid=IwAR0d45GVZewjzOMOip91smejV-lsyi2xTh6wFglK1TvG1BY3CzSXe8Grj-Q] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy - 3 | id:1116194 -

nudges appear to have the greatest impact on choice when people have less developed preferences because they are ambivalent or in doubt about their choice.

[https://www.qeios.com/read/WW04E6.2] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:1116193 -

The COM-B model of behaviour is widely used to identify what needs to change in order for a behaviour change intervention to be effective. It identifies three factors that need to be present for any behaviour to occur: capability, opportunity and motivation. These factors interact over time so that behaviour can be seen as part of a dynamic system with positive and negative feedback loops. Motivation is a core part of the model and the PRIME Theory of motivation provides a framework for understanding how reflective thought processes (Planning and Evaluation processes) and emotional and habitual processes (Motive and Impulse/inhibition processes) interact at every moment leading to behaviour (Responses) at that moment.

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468266721002796] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, sample_campaigns - 3 | id:1098232 -

In our study, no evidence was found for a protective effect of the most common UK safer gambling message. Alternative interventions should be considered as part of an evidence-based public health approach to reducing gambling-related harm.

[https://behaviorchangeimpact.org/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, bibliography, campaign_effects, evaluation, sample_campaigns - 5 | id:1074480 -

Research consistently shows evidence-based social and behavior change (SBC) programs can increase knowledge, shift attitudes and norms and produce changes in a wide variety of behaviors. SBC has proven effective in several health areas, such as increasing the uptake of family planning methods, condom use for HIV prevention, and care-seeking for malaria. Between 2017 and 2019, a series of comprehensive literature reviews were conducted to consolidate evidence that shows the positive impact of SBC interventions on behavioral outcomes related to family planning, HIV, malaria, reproductive empowerment, and the reproductive health of urban youth in low- and middle-income countries. The result is five health area-specific databases that support evidence-based SBC. The databases are searchable by keyword, country, study design, intervention and behavior. The databases extract intervention details, research methodologies and results to facilitate searching. For each of the five health areas, a “Featured Evidence” section highlights a list of key articles demonstrating impact.

[https://irrationallabs.com/how-to-manc/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, social_network, strategy - 4 | id:1074479 -

Mutually-Assured Non-Complacency (MANC) Introducing MANC, a system that helps you achieve your goals. Plainly, MANC is a system that uses the people closest to you to assure that you don’t fall into status quo ruts. It’s Mutually-Assured Non-Complacency. How does it work? First, you define the new desired personal behavior (a.k.a. your goal). Then, you put in a system to achieve it (a.k.a. accountability system). This system gives your friends and family a role in your success. So you think you can MANC? The worksheet gives you the recipe. The videos give you the motivation to start today.

[https://www.habitweekly.com/commitment-device-database] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, strategy - 3 | id:1074478 -

Growing open-sourced database of different commitment devices to help you stick with your intentions and achieve your long-term goals. Read this article for more information on Commitment Devices and how to make the most of this database.

[https://uxdesign.cc/stop-adding-features-to-your-product-start-crafting-behaviors-d6cc27ea1412] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, technology - 3 | id:1066122 -

The best way for increasing the usage and value of the product is crafting the product from a behavioral perspective instead of feature perspective. The best way for changing this mindset is asking simple questions about your users and what behaviors you want to create for bringing them value. Sankey Diagrams are awesome tools for measuring these behaviorals funnels. Once we have detected and optimized the different behaviors, the impact of adding new features will be much higher than before.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPbwn9SSzcI] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, strategy, theory - 4 | id:1064154 -

Bonus talks Why You Forget Everything And What to Do About It w/ Bec Weeks – https://youtu.be/VoDlOmHbaWE The Sneaky Things That Keep Good Habits From Sticking w/ Jessica Malone – https://youtu.be/oCwMXY7u73A Nicolas Fieulaine from NFÉtudes – https://youtu.be/E-XNZUGvVT0 ––– Timestamps 0:00 Event Intro 6:53 The Science of Habit Change with David Neal 38:10 The Science of Mindfulness with Dr. Clare Purvis 53:03 Creatures of Context with David Perrott 1:21:05 Time Smart: How to Reclaim Your Time and Live a Happier Life with Ashley Whillans 2:05:36 The Invisibility of Habit with Wendy Wood 2:34:19 Digital Behavior Change in Health with Jennifer La Guardia & Aline Holzwarth 2:59:11 Better Decision Making at Work: 5 Core Heuristics (& How to Manage Them) with Scott Young, BVA Nudge Unit 3:22:32 All the small things - How behavioral science can help you unlock success in love and at work with Logan Ury & Liz Fosslien 4:09:53 How to apply behavioral insights to cyber security training with Harriet Rowthron from BestAtDigital 4:22:44 Making Meaning When Life Stinks with Yael Schonbrun 4:54:47 The Power of Identity with Dominic Packer 5:30:40 The Untapped Science of Less with Leidy Klotz 5:55:10 Day Wrap-Up with Samuel Salzer & Peter Judodihardjo

[https://www.danielnettle.org.uk/2022/03/28/breaking-cover-on-the-watching-eyes-effect/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, sample_campaigns - 3 | id:1064140 -

In our coffee room experiment, we found that contributions to an honesty box for paying for coffee substantially increased when we stuck photocopied images of eyes on the wall in the coffee corner, compared to when we stuck images of flowers on the wall. This makes the point that people are generally nicer, more cooperative, more ethical, when they believe they are being watched, a point that I believe, in general terms, to be true.

[https://knowledgeauckland.org.nz/media/1889/behavioural-insights-toolkit-rimu-auckland-council-june-2020.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to, inspiration, professional_resource, strategy - 6 | id:1064125 -

This toolkit has been designed by the Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) at Auckland Council to be useful to those wishing to improve public programmes or services, policy development, or team decision-making. It draws on a range of existing resources produced by the Behavioural Insights Team, the OECD and others (see ‘other resources’ on the next page). This toolkit has two components that can be used either separately or together. The first component is a step-by-step process for developing a behavioural intervention. It guides the user through understanding existing behaviours, identifying a desired behaviour, brainstorming ideas for promoting the desired behaviour, and robustly testing the best ideas. The user should follow the steps in the order they are numbered. It is focused on key questions to ask at each step. It is not a complete guide to how to answer these questions, however, and the user may need to rely on other research and evaluation resources to help with each step. The second component of the toolkit is a series of ‘brainstorming’ cards. The cards cover many important behavioural principles to keep in mind when looking to improve programmes, policies, or decision-making. Each card includes a description of the behavioural principle, some examples, and suggestions for how to apply the principle. They can be used on their own or to brainstorm ideas as in the step-by-step process above. To help with navigation, the card set has been organised into a series for better services and a series for better decisionmaking, although there is overlap in the use of the cards. The former is marked with a red dot in the top left corner and the latter with a green dot.

[https://bridges.monash.edu/articles/chapter/Chapter_12_Making_the_most_of_an_effective_intervention/17090318] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:1031184 -

In this chapter we explore three approaches to ensuring that an effective intervention does lead to impact: they are scaling, dissemination, and knowledge translation. Each pathway can increase your impact - i.e., desired behaviour and societal change - but approach this goal from different directions and with emphasis on different activities and outputs. We will introduce you to the three approaches before deep diving into when and how to apply each approach.

[http://revistas.unisinos.br/index.php/sdrj/article/view/sdrj.2021.141.12] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:1031181 -

On the whole, however, these behavioral interventions have been somewhat underwhelming, exposing an inherent brittleness that comes from three common “errors of projection” in current behavioral design methodology: projected stability, which insufficiently plans for the fact that interventions often function within inherently unstable systems; projected persistence, which neglects to account for changes in those system conditions over time; and projected value, which assumes that definitions of success are universally shared across contexts. Borrowing from strategic design and futures thinking, a new proposed strategic foresight model—behavioral planning—can help practitioners better address these system-level, anticipatory, and contextual weaknesses by more systematically identifying potential forces that may impact behavioral interventions before they have been implemented. Behavioral planning will help designers more effectively elicit signals indicating the emergence of forces that may deform behavioral interventions in emergent COVID-19 contexts, and promote “roughly right” directional solutions at earlier stages in solution development to better address system shifts.

[https://www.jmir.org/2022/1/e29969?fbclid=IwAR2pZRebpHzYzAjQstQX7ItXpY2_n-tiDDolxfLpccsr0BAR2nPhkrKxvnk] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, international, sample_campaigns, technology, youth - 5 | id:1029693 -

Leveraging artificial intelligence (AI)–driven apps for health education and promotion can help in the accomplishment of several United Nations sustainable development goals. SnehAI, developed by the Population Foundation of India, is the first Hinglish (Hindi + English) AI chatbot, deliberately designed for social and behavioral changes in India. It provides a private, nonjudgmental, and safe space to spur conversations about taboo topics (such as safe sex and family planning) and offers accurate, relatable, and trustworthy information and resources.

[https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/joes.12453] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy, theory - 4 | id:1028012 -

The presentarticle reviews the debate and research on nudges byfocusing on three main dimensions: (1) the exact defi-nition of nudges; (2) the justification of nudge policies,with a focus on “libertarian paternalism”; and (3) theeffectiveness of nudges, both over time and in compari-son with standard policies.

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