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[https://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/46065/ssoar-rcr-2016-graaf_et_al-Characteristics_of_narrative_interventions_and.pdf?sequence=1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, health_communication, storytelling - 4 | id:244104 -

To provide an overview of the different characteristics of narratives in health effects research and of the persuasive effects that were found, we review 153 experimental studies on health-related narrative persuasion with a focus on the narrative stimuli. The results show that: a) with regard to the content, showing the healthy behavior in a narrative (as opposed to the unhealthy behavior with negative consequences) may be associated with effects on intention. Narratives that contain high emotional content are more often shown to have effects. b) With regard to the form, for print narratives, a first-person perspective is a promising characteristic in light of effectiveness. c) With regard to the context, an overtly persuasive presentation format does not seem to inhibit narrative persuasion. And d) other characteristics, like character similarity or the presentation medium of the narrative, do not seem to be promising characteristics for producing health effects. In addition, fruitful areas for further research can be found in the familiarity of the setting and the way a health message is embedded in the narrative. Because of the diversity of narrative characteristics and effects that were found, continued research effort is warranted on which characteristics lead to effects. The present review provides an overview of the evidence for persuasive narrative characteristics so far.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1359105316656243] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, evaluation, storytelling - 4 | id:244103 -

The objective of this review was to summarize the literature supporting narrative interventions that target health-promoting behaviours. Eligible articles were English-language peer-reviewed studies that quantitatively reported the results of a narrative intervention targeting health-promoting behaviours or theoretical determinants of behaviour. Five public health and psychology databases were searched. A total of 52 studies met inclusion criteria. In all, 14 studies found positive changes in health-promoting behaviours after exposure to a narrative intervention. The results for the changes in theoretical determinants were mixed. While narrative appears to be a promising intervention strategy, more research is needed to determine how and when to use these interventions.

[https://www.theverge.com/2019/3/26/18282535/madam-secretary-measles-outbreaks-mmr-vaccine-misinformation-anti-vaxxer-cbs] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education - 1 | id:243979 -

Measles appeared as the villain in the latest episode of the CBS show Madam Secretary. The story arc captured the risks of vaccine hesitancy — and it showcases the power of a fictional TV show to communicate facts.

[https://www.thecompassforsbc.org/sites/default/files/project_examples/My%20Island%20-%20Scriptwriters%20Guide%20-%20HIVAIDS%5B4%5D.pdf] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling - 2 | id:234069 -

To provide technical advice to the scriptwriters of Callaloo to help translate science to relevant messages and actions to address knowledge, attitude and behavior changes in the key results areas. Building the knowledge, shifting attitudes and ultimately changing behaviors will support reaching the objectives of the program. The following HIV/AIDS scriptwriters guide has been developed based on the results of the knowledge, attitude and behavior change (KAB) baseline survey conducted between January to March 2012 and supplemented by current research conducted by key partners (Refer to Sources of Information).

[https://docplayer.net/19064407-The-secrets-of-storytelling-why-we-love-a-good-yarn.html] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling, theory - 3 | id:232146 -

In it, he examined the work of psychologists and neuroscientists who are studying the human penchant for storytelling. What they are discovering is fascinating, but it boils down to this: People are wired to enjoy stories. Here are some key quotes that I took away from Hsu’s article: Storytelling is one of the few human traits that are truly universal across culture and through all of known history. … People in societies of all types weave narratives … And when a characteristic behavior shows up in so many different societies, researchers pay attention: its roots may tell us something about our evolutionary past. However narrative is defined, people know it when they feel it. Whether fiction or nonfiction, a narrative engages its audience through psychological realism — recognizable emotions and believable interactions among characters. [T]he best stories … captivate their audience, whose emotions can be inextricably tied to those of the story’s characters. Such immersion is a state psychologists call “narrative transport”. [M]ost scientists are starting to agree: stories have such a powerful and universal appeal that the neurological roots of both telling tales and enjoying them are probably tied to crucial parts of our social cognition. A 2007 study … found that a test audience responded more positively to advertisements in narrative form as compared with straightforward ads that encouraged viewers to think about the arguments for a product. Similarly … labeling information as “fact” increased critical analysis, whereas labeling information as “fiction” had the opposite effect. Studies such as these suggest people accept ideas more readily when their minds are in story mode as opposed to when they are in an analytical mind-set.Scientific American Mind - September 18, 2008 The Secrets of Storytelling: Why We Love a Good Yarn Our love for telling tales reveals the workings of the mind By Jeremy Hsu When Brad Pitt tells Eric Bana

[http://jdc.journals.unisel.edu.my/ojs/index.php/jdc/issue/view/7] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, conference, entertainment_education, health_communication, storytelling - 5 | id:229957 -

In April 2018, almost 1,200 people gathered in Indonesia for the Summit on Behaviour and Social Change Communication. Practitioners, researchers, donors, and leaders from more than 400 organisations travelled to Nusa Dua from the Asia Pacific region, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America. This issue features ten papers prepared by SUMMIT participants based on their presentations. They cover a range of challenges from using story-telling to help fishermen in Belize deal with threats to their occupations, and influencing adolescent girls and boys in India to address gender discrimination and stereotyping – to the use of social media to change norms regarding babies’ health in Malawi.

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