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[https://www.thecompassforsbc.org/sites/default/files/project_examples/My%20Island%20-%20Scriptwriters%20Guide%20-%20HIVAIDS%5B4%5D.pdf] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling - 2 | id:234069 -

To provide technical advice to the scriptwriters of Callaloo to help translate science to relevant messages and actions to address knowledge, attitude and behavior changes in the key results areas. Building the knowledge, shifting attitudes and ultimately changing behaviors will support reaching the objectives of the program. The following HIV/AIDS scriptwriters guide has been developed based on the results of the knowledge, attitude and behavior change (KAB) baseline survey conducted between January to March 2012 and supplemented by current research conducted by key partners (Refer to Sources of Information).

[https://docplayer.net/19064407-The-secrets-of-storytelling-why-we-love-a-good-yarn.html] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling, theory - 3 | id:232146 -

In it, he examined the work of psychologists and neuroscientists who are studying the human penchant for storytelling. What they are discovering is fascinating, but it boils down to this: People are wired to enjoy stories. Here are some key quotes that I took away from Hsu’s article: Storytelling is one of the few human traits that are truly universal across culture and through all of known history. … People in societies of all types weave narratives … And when a characteristic behavior shows up in so many different societies, researchers pay attention: its roots may tell us something about our evolutionary past. However narrative is defined, people know it when they feel it. Whether fiction or nonfiction, a narrative engages its audience through psychological realism — recognizable emotions and believable interactions among characters. [T]he best stories … captivate their audience, whose emotions can be inextricably tied to those of the story’s characters. Such immersion is a state psychologists call “narrative transport”. [M]ost scientists are starting to agree: stories have such a powerful and universal appeal that the neurological roots of both telling tales and enjoying them are probably tied to crucial parts of our social cognition. A 2007 study … found that a test audience responded more positively to advertisements in narrative form as compared with straightforward ads that encouraged viewers to think about the arguments for a product. Similarly … labeling information as “fact” increased critical analysis, whereas labeling information as “fiction” had the opposite effect. Studies such as these suggest people accept ideas more readily when their minds are in story mode as opposed to when they are in an analytical mind-set.Scientific American Mind - September 18, 2008 The Secrets of Storytelling: Why We Love a Good Yarn Our love for telling tales reveals the workings of the mind By Jeremy Hsu When Brad Pitt tells Eric Bana

[http://jdc.journals.unisel.edu.my/ojs/index.php/jdc/issue/view/7] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, conference, entertainment_education, health_communication, storytelling - 5 | id:229957 -

In April 2018, almost 1,200 people gathered in Indonesia for the Summit on Behaviour and Social Change Communication. Practitioners, researchers, donors, and leaders from more than 400 organisations travelled to Nusa Dua from the Asia Pacific region, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America. This issue features ten papers prepared by SUMMIT participants based on their presentations. They cover a range of challenges from using story-telling to help fishermen in Belize deal with threats to their occupations, and influencing adolescent girls and boys in India to address gender discrimination and stereotyping – to the use of social media to change norms regarding babies’ health in Malawi.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/yes-tv-can-make-you-a-better-person_us_56be5834e4b0b40245c6c62f?utm_content=buffer1453b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling - 2 | id:76566 -

According to a recent study of about 100 college students, some TV shows help viewers to become kinder and more generous toward people who are different from them — even if the show itself doesn’t directly address diversity. “After viewing meaningful entertainment, as opposed to more humorous entertainment, people were more likely to help in general, but also they were more likely to help someone who was different from them,” explained Erica Bailey, a mass communications doctoral student at Penn State and lead author of the study.

[http://andaction.org/] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education - 1 | id:76671 -

We connect TV/film dealing with important issues to nonprofits working to spark social change. Call for Action! on set + real-world impact = AndACTION. A project of Spitfire Strategies.

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