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[http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/five-marketing-lessons-from-the-payless-shoe-store-prank/?platform=hootsuite] - - public:weinreich
branding, marketing - 2 | id:229156 -

The prank says something very powerful about consumer behavior: When it comes to quality, perception is reality. The shoppers believed they were purchasing luxury footwear because they were fed an array of social and environmental cues, not because of the shoes themselves.

[http://asburyandasbury.com/blog/2016/11/8/conversation-my-arse] - - public:weinreich
advertising, branding, marketing, product, social_media - 5 | id:229099 -

Andrex has become a great case study in modern marketing, because it represents the logical outcome of two dominant trends: the mission escalation trend and the conversation trend. Both are waves of brand thinking that have swept all before them in recent years, and it’s not exactly Andrex’s fault that they have been caught up in it. It’s just that the nature of their business means stretching both trends to breaking point. First, there’s the mission escalation trend. This is the homeopathy of marketing. It involves taking the functional purpose of any given product, diluting it to a slightly more abstract level, then diluting it again and repeating the process until you reach a level of abstraction so remote that any sense of specific purpose has been lost entirely. So if your product is a bar of chocolate, it’s not about giving people something chocolatey to eat, it’s about giving them a tasty treat. And it’s not about giving them a tasty treat, it’s about giving them a treat in a wider sense. And it’s not about the treat as such, but the enjoyment you get from that treat. And it’s not about the physical enjoyment, but the emotional enjoyment. And it’s not about the emotional enjoyment, but joy itself. And it’s not about experiencing joy, it’s about believing in joy. And now your brand purpose is more closely aligned to Buddhism than it is to chocolate.

[https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/best-practice/health-and-safety/nudge-in-the-right-direction-using-psychology-to-boost-safety/10035384.article] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:229064 -

Cowry developed three interventions to tackle these challenges and improve health and safety: painting the canteen a shade of pink proven to reduce stress hormones; introducing a gold card system whereby workers who demonstrated safe behaviours entered a weekly prize lottery; and having specialists walk around site asking scripted questions that prompt workers to think about safety.

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827316301537?via%3Dihub] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, quantitative, research - 3 | id:226457 -

•Despite its sequential nature, healthcare seeking is often analysed as single event. •We demonstrate the value of sequential healthcare data analysis. •Descriptive analysis exposes otherwise neglected behavioural patterns. •Sequence-insensitive indicators can be inconsistent and misleading. •Sequence-sensitive evaluation hints at adverse behaviours of wealthy patients.

[https://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-to-build-your-own-paris-agreement-on-climate-change-in-your-own-home-2017-06-02] - - public:weinreich
environment, health_communication, sample_campaigns - 3 | id:226380 -

Good, very concrete communications with examples of exactly how much of a difference an individual can make to prevent people from feeling overwhelmed and like they can't make a difference on the issue

[https://medium.com/dropbox-design/breakups-space-travel-and-design-research-b0a1645724c2?ref=uxdesignweekly] - - public:weinreich
creativity, design, qualitative, research - 4 | id:226318 -

At Dropbox, we’ve found that metaphors are a powerful tool to help people explore and share their experiences in more creative and meaningful ways. We use metaphors in research so people can talk about their experiences through a different lens. We can do this simply by inviting people to make a comparison through a single question. Or we can facilitate entire interviews by using tools to symbolize and explore meaning together.

[https://theoryandtechniquetool.humanbehaviourchange.org/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:226284 -

The Theory & Techniques Tool is an interactive resource providing information about links between behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and their mechanisms of action (MoAs). This information is based on MRC-funded research triangulating evidence of links made by authors in published scientific studies and by expert consensus [Project Website - http://www.ucl.ac.uk/behaviour-change-techniques]. It was developed to support intervention designers, researchers and theorists in the development and evaluation of theory-based interventions.

[https://www.psiweb.org/docs/default-source/2018-psi-conference-posters/48-julie-jones.pdf?sfvrsn=cb68dedb_4] - - public:weinreich
graphic_design, quantitative, research - 3 | id:226195 -

Effective visualizations communicate complex statistical and quantitative information facilitating insight, understanding, and decision making. But what is an effective graph? This cheat sheet provides general guidance and points to consider.

[http://sellsellblog.blogspot.com/2010/02/this-is-truth-about-advertising-blog.html?m=1] - - public:weinreich
advertising, inspiration - 2 | id:187518 -

It is now over 50 years since I read the famous conversation between Max Hart of Hart, Shaffner and Marx and his ad agent, Hart said he would never read long copy. His agent said, "I'll just give you the headline of a full page all-copy ad. You would read every word." "What is it?" asked Hart. "This is the truth about Max Hart," his agent replied. It reminded me of one of my favourite quotes, from Howard Gossage: "People read what interests them, sometimes it's an ad".

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6-3-5_Brainwriting] - - public:weinreich
creativity, management, training - 3 | id:187498 -

In brief, it consists of 6 participants supervised by a moderator who are required to write down 3 ideas on a specific worksheet within 5 minutes, this is also the etymology of the methodology's name. The outcome after 6 rounds, during which participants swap their worksheets passing them on to the team member sitting at their right, is 108 ideas generated in 30 minutes.

[https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/behavioral-economics/compliance-challenges-public-sector-programs.html?id=us:2sm:3li:4di4756:5awa:6di:MMDDYY::author&pkid=1005588] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, government, policy - 4 | id:187323 -

But to be effective, nudges should be calibrated; “one size fits all” approaches tend to fall short of expectations. Instead, policymakers can tailor their nudges to align with these three dimensions: Spectrums of acceptability (and deviance). How strictly must targets adhere to the rule? While driving a couple of miles over the speed limit is unlikely to result in a traffic violation, attempting to bring a weapon onto an airplane requires zero-tolerance enforcement. Frequency of action. How often must the target group provide input? It may be easier to have targets make a single decision to contribute or obey, as opposed to encouraging them to repeatedly make the same decision over time. For example, people usually only need to choose to be an organ donor once, but drivers put their seat belt on every time they get into a car. Target group diversity. How heterogeneous is your target group? People may come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, have different interests, or may speak another language, all of which makes it challenging to apply a blanket rule with universal success. Moreover, targets can be geographically scattered or online, making it difficult for policymakers to surveil the target group. For example, all vehicle owners must register their cars, but not everyone should seek the same preventative medical treatments. And even those that do require similar treatments may have different motivations for doing so.

[https://designsprintkit.withgoogle.com/introduction/overview] - - public:weinreich
design, how_to, management - 3 | id:187322 -

The Design Sprint Kit is an open-source resource for design leaders, product owners, developers or anyone who is learning about or running Design Sprints. Whether you are new to Design Sprints and gaining buy in for your first Sprint, or an experienced Sprint facilitator looking for new methods, this site will help you learn, plan, and contribute to the Design Sprint Methodology.

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/future-minded/201810/nudge-fudge-leaves-policy-makers-in-the-dark] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, evaluation, government, policy - 5 | id:187321 -

Our work published this week analyses all 111 cases studies of behavioral techniques used by governments compiled by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). Our analysis demonstrates that none of the techniques used have scientific proven effectiveness.

[http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0013916511402673] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, evaluation - 3 | id:186975 -

To provide practitioners with useful information about how to promote proenvironmental behavior (PEB), a meta-analysis was performed on 87 published reports containing 253 experimental treatments that measured an observed, not self-reported, behavioral outcome. Most studies combined multiple treatments, and this confounding precluded definitive conclusions about which individual treatments are most effective. Treatments that included cognitive dissonance, goal setting, social modeling, and prompts provided the overall largest effect sizes (Hedge’s g > 0.60).

[https://www.fastcompany.com/90176846/the-magic-number-of-people-needed-to-create-social-change] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, social_change, social_norms - 3 | id:186807 -

A new study published in Science has quantified the number of people who need to take a stand before they can affect societal change on important topics like sexual harassment and human rights. And that number? It’s a mere 25% of any group. Only 25% of people need to adopt a new social norm to create an inflection point where everyone in the group follows.

[https://www.nature.com/articles/s41746-018-0031-7%C2%A0] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, online_marketing, social_media - 4 | id:186806 -

Our results show that 48% of people who were exposed to the ads made future searches for weight loss information, compared with 32% of those in the control group—a 50% increase. The advertisements varied in efficacy. However, the effectiveness of the advertisements may be greatly improved by targeting individuals based on their lifestyle preferences and/or sociodemographic characteristics, which together explain 49% of the variation in response to the ads. These results demonstrate that online advertisements hold promise as a mechanism for changing population health behaviors.

[https://www.alterspark.com/blog/claim-1-takes-21-days-form-habit] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy, theory - 3 | id:186802 -

From my own experience, there appears to be a scientific trend (that I have not systematically evaluated) that successful behavior change programs tend to run for approximately 2-months, and that after this point, there is a large drop in adherence and impact. The big statistical meta-analysis that I carried out a few years back (http://www.jmir.org/2011/1/e17/), showed that online programs lasting more than 4 months, all failed. So as a rule of thumb, for most general purposes, 8-weeks is not a bad approximate time duration for many programs.

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