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[http://affectivebrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/41562_2019_793_OnlinePDF_2.pdf] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, mental_health, technology - 3 | id:277149 -

Immense amounts of information are now accessible to people, including information that bears on their past, present and future. An important research challenge is to determine how people decide to seek or avoid information. Here we propose a framework of information-seeking that aims to integrate the diverse motives that drive information-seeking and its avoidance. Our framework rests on the idea that information can alter people’s action, affect and cognition in both positive and negative ways. The suggestion is that people assess these influences and integrate them into a calculation of the value of information that leads to information-seeking or avoidance. The theory offers a framework for characterizing and quantifying individual differences in information-seeking, which we hypothesize may also be diagnostic of mental health. We consider biases that can lead to both insufficient and excessive information-seeking. We also discuss how the framework can help government agencies to assess the welfare effects of mandatory information disclosure.

[https://hxldash.com/] - - public:weinreich
graphic_design, international, quantitative, research - 4 | id:277148 -

HXLDash is a dashboard and online mapping tool designed for humanitarians and humanitarian contexts. HXLDash's aim is to make creating dashboards possible in less than 2 minutes by leveraging the power of the Humanitarian Exchange Language and linking to the common operation datasets.

[https://www.thegoodmancenter.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/freerange_2020_01.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, storytelling - 3 | id:277022 -

And as to the central question of using both fear and hope: “I think we're in a moment where fear is a stronger motivator than hope,“ Parfrey began. “I'm looking at the evidence. I'm looking at Greta Thunberg. There is a tinge of the apocalypse in her framing.“ But Parfrey was quick to add that fear, by itself, isn't the only button to press. “The data is clear on this,“ he said. “The more dire the messages sound, the more individuals will tuneout. And I say this with full-knowledge that the climate picture is dire. You have to be honest, you have to present the sobering information, yet we still have the choice before us to dramatically improve the situation or make it worse. The choice is still ours.“

[https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0226394&utm_campaign=Feed%3A%20plosone%2FPLoSONE%20%28PLOS%20ONE%20-%20New%20Articles%29&utm_content=110096915&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&hss_channel=tw-3176472351] - - public:weinreich
quantitative, research - 2 | id:273190 -

In this article, we demonstrated that contrary to the thinking that suggests MTurk is a tapped-out resource, in reality, the opposite is true: MTurk is a vast resource with untapped potential researchers can capitalize on by changing the way they use the platform.

[https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fundraising/2018-19_Report] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, nonprofit, social_norms - 3 | id:273154 -

Addressing the Social Proof Question The online fundraising team often receives questions and comments about the use of negative social proof in our fundraising messages. Social proof is the phenomenon that people are prone to copy the actions of others; for example, if an individual is exposed to a group of people doing or buying something, they are more likely to do so themselves. One of the most recognizable phrases in our fundraising banners takes the opposite approach, stating: “... fewer than 1% of readers give.” and/or “... 99% of readers don’t give.” The online fundraising team has tested, dozens of times, removing this fact from our materials. Our donation rate drops when we try. This past year we engaged with some experts in the field and asked them to explore further why we consistently see this finding. Is there something about a non-profit or a donation context that alters the rules of social proof? We plan on continuing to conduct tests this coming year in hopes of finding conclusions around the fundraising and non-profit context of social proof.

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