yabs.io

Yet Another Bookmarks Service

Viewing weinreich's Bookmarks

social_change delete ,

[https://www.designforbelonging.com/] - - public:weinreich
design, social_change - 2 | id:1098164 -

Design for Belonging is a framework to support you to build greater belonging and reduce othering in your community. Includes toolkit, resources.

[https://www.unhcr.org/innovation/unsung/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, social_change, storytelling - 3 | id:1028009 -

The UN Refugee Agency’s Project Unsung is a speculative storytelling project that brings together creative collaborators from around the world to help reimagine the humanitarian sector and promote narrative change and foresight in our work. The worlds produced through mediums such as non-fiction essays, science fiction, poetry, art and illustration, create visions for how we might radically reimagine our work with communities, our organizations, and our relationships to each other and the planet. The collection is framed across three overarching issues that we believe to be critical for building just futures: Nature (restoring and repairing the world by confronting climate change and ecological loss); Identity (fostering belonging, connection, and kinship); Power (reimaging and reconfiguring power dynamics and social transformation through decolonizing, localizing, and building solidarity across difference). The story of humanitarian innovation needs a new chapter. Join us in imagining better worlds.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMLoYpy_HFw] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, international, place, policy, sample_campaigns, social_change, strategy, target_audience - 8 | id:1021804 -

In 2010, Colombia's defense minister contacted an ad agency to create an idea to demobilize FARC members, the oldest guerrilla army in Latin America. The agency, after spending over a year talking to nearly 100 of its members, learned two main things (1). -First, guerrilla members are ordinary men and women and not only guerrillas, a fact which is often forgotten after 60 years at war. -Secondly, they are more likely to demobilize during Christmas as it is a sensitive and emotional period. Based on these insights, they had a clever idea to put a Christmas tree in strategic walking paths in the middle of the jungle that would light up when someone passed by with a message promoting demobilization. The results? Three hundred thirty-one people who demobilized named this idea as one of the reasons to do so. Over the years, several campaigns from the same agency were quite successful, and overall, they were named in over 800 demobilizations. Causality, of course, cannot be established. Nevertheless, any measurable, non-violent efforts like this one are praised. Next time you think you have a difficult-to-reach customer, maybe think again!

[https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/10/how-public-health-took-part-its-own-downfall/620457/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=share] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, policy, social_change - 3 | id:830188 -

“...Public health’s attempts at being apolitical push it further toward irrelevance. In truth, public health is inescapably political, not least because it has to make decisions in the face of rapidly evolving and contested evidence.“

[https://thezvi.wordpress.com/2021/10/28/an-unexpected-victory-container-stacking-at-the-port-of-los-angeles/] - - public:weinreich
media_advocacy, social_change, storytelling - 3 | id:830176 -

Then our hero enters, and decides to coordinate and plan a persuasion campaign to get the rule changed. Here’s how I think this went down. He in advance arranges for various sources to give him a signal boost when the time comes, in various ways. He designs the message for a format that will have maximum reach and be maximally persuasive. This takes the form of an easy to tell physical story, that he pretends to have only discovered now. Since all actual public discourse now takes place on Twitter, it takes the form of a Twitter thread, which I will reproduce here in full.

[https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-31/june-2018/ive-built-good-mousetrap-and-people-come-use-it] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, inspiration, social_change, social_marketing, target_audience - 5 | id:802632 -

Schwartz has spent much of his career emphasising the shared, universal nature of values and in one paper with Anat Bardi, he demonstrates that Benevolence, Universalism and Self-direction values are consistently rated most important to most people across different cultures. The answers he has just given map pretty neatly onto Self-direction and Benevolence (see Figure 1). Figure 1: Value structure across 68 countries – Public Interest Research Centre (2011) based on Schwartz (1992) The Schwartz model shows that values have neighbours and opposites, that values close together (e.g. Humble, Honest) tend to have similar importance to people, that values far away (e.g. Equality, Social Power) act more like a seesaw – as one rises in importance, the other falls. When you add to this that values connect to behaviour (that Universalism and Benevolence are associated with cooperation, sustainable behaviour, civic engagement and acceptance of diversity – that Achievement and Power are most emphatically not), and that values can be engaged, you have more than a model: you have an imperative for all the activists and campaigners scrabbling around for the messages and tactics that are going to change the world.

[https://israelseen.com/tel-aviv-university-the-biological-mechanism-of-pro-social-behavior/?fbclid=IwAR1w5MY7HR8qtUdRZfiRLGJ6W1Uej3TZUJLo5arbvXXHZTLvxEJ718IuDmk] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, social_change, social_norms - 3 | id:797641 -

“This research shows that the reward system has an important function in helping behavior and if we want to increase the likelihood of pro-social behavior, we must reinforce a sense of belonging more than a sense of empathy.

[https://rescueagency.com/strategy/policy-360?utm_campaign=Behavior%20Change%20Fundamentals&utm_content=150405439&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&hss_channel=tw-450048630] - - public:weinreich
policy, social_change - 2 | id:488449 -

[https://stratechery.com/2020/the-idea-adoption-curve/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, marketing, social_change, technology, theory - 5 | id:438382 -

The key in all this is crossing the chasm—performing the acts that allow the first shoots of that mainstream market to emerge. This is a do-or-die proposition for high-tech enterprises; hence it is logical that they be the crucible in which “chasm theory” is formed. But the principles can be generalized to other forms of marketing, so for the general reader who can bear with all the high-tech examples in this book, useful lessons may be learned.

[https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190513-it-only-takes-35-of-people-to-change-the-world] - - public:weinreich
social_change, strategy - 2 | id:385098 -

Looking at hundreds of campaigns over the last century, Chenoweth found that nonviolent campaigns are twice as likely to achieve their goals as violent campaigns. And although the exact dynamics will depend on many factors, she has shown it takes around 3.5% of the population actively participating in the protests to ensure serious political change. Overall, nonviolent campaigns were twice as likely to succeed as violent campaigns: they led to political change 53% of the time compared to 26% for the violent protests.

[https://wellmadestrategy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Strategic-Comms-for-Social-Change-Web.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, how_to, social_change, social_marketing - 4 | id:350261 -

This handbook has been compiled by Well Made Strategy (WMS) who have extensive professional experience developing impactful strategic communications across a range of sectors from security to financial inclusion, education, agriculture, health and governance. WMS helps individuals, organisations and networks harness the power of strategic communications to influence policy change, prepare for and anticipate crises, inform the national discourse, build will for social reform and nudge entire communities towards new ways of thinking and behaviours. We have developed this handbook to serve as a guide to strategic communications for those interested in using strategic communications but who may not have an in-depth understanding of the concept.

[https://wellmadestrategy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Workbook-Strategic-Comms-for-Social-change.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, how_to, social_change, social_marketing - 4 | id:350260 -

The purpose of this workbook is to provide a workspace for you to develop your own communications strategy by working through the various modules of the Strategic Communications for Social Change handbook. While the workbook is separate from the handbook, they are closely linked to each other.

[https://www.luca-dellanna.com/thoughts-of-the-week-61/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, social_change - 2 | id:310160 -

It’s not that all change is bottom-up, but: long-lasting change usually is (here is why) it’s always worth asking yourself if what looks like a top-down change was initiated the bottom-up way. This phenomenon applies to many contexts: companies pivoting to what others (the bottom-up) proved working, managers promoting those employees who demonstrated deserving it, gatekeepers opening up once someone demonstrated having a (bottom-up) following. The top-down usually follows the bottom-up. More precisely, it goes as follows: The bottom-up initiates change, locally. If it sustains over time, the top-down formalizes it. The rest of the population adopts it, even if it lives far from who initiated point (1). The implication is: if you want change, do not live under the illusion that you need to wait for the top-down to give you the green light. The top-down will give you the green light once it is shown that your idea works (and it’s on you to show them).

[https://www.fsnnetwork.org/theory-change-training-curriculum] - - public:weinreich
social_change, theory, training - 3 | id:272208 -

Diverse guidance exists on how to best design and use a TOC. In this curriculum (Theory of Change: Facilitator’s Guide and all accompanying materials), we present one method that does its best to align to the requirements of creating a development hypothesis for Development Food Security Activities (DFSA) funded by USAID’s Office of Food for Peace (FFP). Previous experience in program and TOC development, participant feedback from six years of TOPS workshops, and input from the FFP Monitoring and Evaluation Team all helped craft this curriculum. We update it each year to align to the most current FFP guidance for DFSA implementers and to share newly discovered training tips.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/lessons_for_social_change_communications_strategy_from_the_us_marriage_equality_and_antismoking_campaigns] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, social_change, social_norms, tobacco - 5 | id:272045 -

Aspirational Communication, an approach that seeks to motivate and mobilize people to support a cause by connecting it to the audience’s aspirations for their own lives. I specifically suggest a six-step framework based on the approach that can help social movements to drive durable attitude change.

[https://narrativeinitiative.org/blog/explanation-how-narrative] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, social_change, storytelling - 4 | id:271989 -

Released in March as part of FrameWorks Institute’s 20th anniversary, the Explanation Declaration asks communicators to help people understand the “how” behind issues and see that how as a critical part of engaging and empowering people to take action.

[https://digitalprinciples.org/wp-content/uploads/Context-Analysis_Framework_v3-1.pdf] - - public:weinreich
research, social_change, strategy, technology - 4 | id:271931 -

Context analysis helps you to understand the elements of an environment and a group of potential users so that you can design a better technology project. It should involve key stakeholders, including implementing partners, donors, local and national authorities, and community members. We suggest five key lines of inquiry that context analyses should consider: People: Levels of education and literacy, information habits and needs, access to disposable income for equipment, electrical power to charge devices, and airtime and data to run them, and network access; Community: How membership of specific groups may affect access to technology and communications habits. For example, a nomadic clan may have attributable characteristics shared by its members, and variations in levels of access and freedom within the clan differentiated by gender and age. Market environment: An understanding of the key players, legal and regulatory issues, the mobile market, including both cost and distribution of agent networks, and the infrastructure, including commercial mobile infrastructure such as the availability of short-codes and APIs are all critical to making good design decisions. Political environment: understanding governance and control of, and access to, communications infrastructure by government and other actors Implementing organization: Many interventions have failed because staff were not able to maintain technology, because power or access to internet were not strong enough, because staff capacity was low or went away, or because the intervention was not supported by a broader culture of innovation and adaptive learning.

[https://medium.com/bending-the-arc/the-science-of-belief-move-beyond-us-and-them-to-we-877a5d714a9c] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, social_change, storytelling - 3 | id:271901 -

News media often frame refugees as a burden or threat to a community, where humanitarian stories often frame refugees as helpless people in a far-off land in need of help. Both narratives — while sympathetic — consistently situate refugees as outsiders. Our job as communicators is to shift the narrative from “us” and “them” to “we.”

[https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/11/how-veganism-became-mainstream/] - - public:weinreich
social_change, social_norms - 2 | id:271899 -

Government and environmentalists need to understand this. To achieve change, you needn’t legislate so everyone adopts new behaviours simultaneously: you simply need to ensure every desirable new behaviour (veganism, installing solar panels, not flying when you can travel by train) reaches that level where it no longer looks weird. If just 10 per cent of attendees refuse to fly to a meeting, it becomes essential to offer videoconferencing, at which point a further 10 per cent will opt to attend the meeting remotely. If 10 per cent start taking trains to Frankfurt, it will pay to launch a European sleeper train service, at which point another 10 per cent will take the train. Once someone on your street has solar panels, you’ll feel happier installing your own. The biggest single influence on whether people drink Guinness in a pub is whether there is already someone in the pub drinking Guinness. A lot of socially beneficial behaviours work the same way. It’s not that we don’t want to do them — we do. We just don’t want to be the weirdo who does it first.

With marked bookmarks
| (+) | |

Viewing 1 - 50, 50 links out of 274 links, page: 1

Follow Tags

Manage

Export:

JSONXMLRSS