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[http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/multimedia/Interactives/artsedge-games/170224-artsedge-games.aspx#ae-games-larp] - - public:weinreich
gaming, storytelling, youth - 3 | id:266968 -

The ARTSEDGE Role-Playing System is designed to teach students the process of creating a game, rather than focusing on game play. In this approach to the literary arts, students begin with an existing book or short story from the curriculum to create and present their own role-playing game (R.P.G.) using rules adapted from the Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition Players Handbook. Educators use The ARTSEDGE Role-Playing System to guide students in groups of 3-6 through game ideation, world building, rule making, and game running, all based on the selected source material. Students are also encouraged to incorporate visual arts, music, and theatre into their presentations.

[https://1832communications.com/blog/modern-day-storytelling/] - - public:weinreich
social_media, storytelling - 2 | id:266073 -

It was a fun presentation mixing the good and the bad. A chance to groan, cringe, shake one’s head in disapproval but also to smile and laugh. The goal was to learn from the mistakes and successes of others. Below is a brief roundup of the presentation, with some of the components of modern day storytelling. At the end of this post you’ll find a “cheat sheet” of do’s and dont’s when posting publicly which you can download, print and keep handy.

[https://www.echorivera.com/blog/science-comic-coffin] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, graphic_design, storytelling - 3 | id:266004 -

Before we get started…there’s a free PDF download available that’s related to this post. It has: 3 prompts to help you brainstorm what your comic could be about. 3 comic creation tips to help think more visually and help you create a comic. 5 comic page layouts you can use to sketch out your comic!

[http://www.comminit.com/health/content/formulas-prevention-narrative-versus-non-narrative-formats-comparative-analysis-their-ef] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, HIV_AIDS, storytelling - 3 | id:265973 -

The study found that the non-narrative (expository) profile produced a greater increase in knowledge, while the narrative profile led to greater change in more responsible preventive attitudes and behaviours.

[https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/the-real-reason-fans-hate-the-last-season-of-game-of-thrones/?fbclid=IwAR3FnkKdemRUGPcrdfwe7ZVZ5YiaKD17htpygt3KLiut5hdeaROvdonU2dg] - - public:weinreich
social_change, storytelling - 2 | id:264280 -

Benioff and Weiss steer the narrative lane away from the sociological and shifted to the psychological. That’s the main, and often only, way Hollywood and most television writers tell stories. This is an important shift to dissect because whether we tell our stories primarily from a sociological or psychological point of view has great consequences for how we deal with our world and the problems we encounter.

[https://wip.pubpub.org/collectivewisdom] - - public:weinreich
management, media, social_change, storytelling, target_audience - 5 | id:253344 -

Why co-create and why now? Collective Wisdom is a first-of-its-kind field study of the media industry, that maps works that live outside the limits of singular authorship. While the concept of co-creation is entering the zeitgeist, it is an ancient and under-reported dynamic. Media co-creation has particular relevance in the face of today’s myriad of challenges, such as the climate crisis and threats to democracy. But it is not without risks and complications. In this study we look at how people co-create within communities; across disciplines; and increasingly, with living systems and artificial intelligence (AI). We also synthesize the risks, as well as the practical lessons from the field on how to co-create with an ethos grounded in principles of equity and justice. This qualitative study reframes how culture is produced, and is a first step in articulating contemporary co-creative practices and ethics. In doing so, it connects unusual dots.

[https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2033192] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, storytelling, theory - 3 | id:244106 -

tories, and their ability to transport their audience, constitute a central part of human life and consumption experience. Integrating previous literature derived from fields as diverse as anthropology, marketing, psychology, communication, consumer, and literary studies, this article offers a review of two decades’ worth of research on narrative transportation, the phenomenon in which consumers mentally enter a world that a story evokes. Despite the relevance of narrative transportation for storytelling and narrative persuasion, extant contributions seem to lack systematization. The authors conceive the extended transportation-imagery model (ETIM), which provides not only a comprehensive model that includes the antecedents and consequences of narrative transportation but also a multidisciplinary framework in which cognitive psychology and consumer culture theory cross-fertilize this field of inquiry. The authors test the model using a quantitative meta-analysis of 132 effect sizes of narrative transportation from 76 published and unpublished articles and identify fruitful directions for further research.

[https://confluence.gallatin.nyu.edu/sections/creative-non-fiction/the-storytelling-animal] - - public:weinreich
storytelling, theory - 2 | id:244105 -

This principle of storytelling (more accurately, story-creating) does not only apply to bizarre YouTube videos featuring shapes. We are all perpetual storytellers in and of our own lives—in fact, we often see our lives as a “journey.” When we tell our friends anecdotes from the past, when we gossip or tell jokes, we are striving to find meaning and order in our lives through storytelling.

[https://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/46065/ssoar-rcr-2016-graaf_et_al-Characteristics_of_narrative_interventions_and.pdf?sequence=1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, health_communication, storytelling - 4 | id:244104 -

To provide an overview of the different characteristics of narratives in health effects research and of the persuasive effects that were found, we review 153 experimental studies on health-related narrative persuasion with a focus on the narrative stimuli. The results show that: a) with regard to the content, showing the healthy behavior in a narrative (as opposed to the unhealthy behavior with negative consequences) may be associated with effects on intention. Narratives that contain high emotional content are more often shown to have effects. b) With regard to the form, for print narratives, a first-person perspective is a promising characteristic in light of effectiveness. c) With regard to the context, an overtly persuasive presentation format does not seem to inhibit narrative persuasion. And d) other characteristics, like character similarity or the presentation medium of the narrative, do not seem to be promising characteristics for producing health effects. In addition, fruitful areas for further research can be found in the familiarity of the setting and the way a health message is embedded in the narrative. Because of the diversity of narrative characteristics and effects that were found, continued research effort is warranted on which characteristics lead to effects. The present review provides an overview of the evidence for persuasive narrative characteristics so far.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1359105316656243] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, evaluation, storytelling - 4 | id:244103 -

The objective of this review was to summarize the literature supporting narrative interventions that target health-promoting behaviours. Eligible articles were English-language peer-reviewed studies that quantitatively reported the results of a narrative intervention targeting health-promoting behaviours or theoretical determinants of behaviour. Five public health and psychology databases were searched. A total of 52 studies met inclusion criteria. In all, 14 studies found positive changes in health-promoting behaviours after exposure to a narrative intervention. The results for the changes in theoretical determinants were mixed. While narrative appears to be a promising intervention strategy, more research is needed to determine how and when to use these interventions.

[https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0754/713b05da5f05d699ac856a17c1ab3348290c.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, storytelling, theory - 4 | id:244102 -

Narrative is the basic mode of human interaction and a fundamental way of acquiring knowledge. In the rapidly growing field of health communication, narrative approaches are emerging as a promising set of tools for motivating and supporting health-behavior change. This article defines narrative communication and describes the rationale for using it in health-promotion programs, reviews theoretical explanations of narrative effects and research comparing narrative and nonnarrative approaches to persuasion, and makes recommendations for future research needs in narrative health communication.

[https://www.johnhaydon.com/increase-fundraising-results-donor-hero/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, nonprofit, storytelling - 4 | id:244078 -

When you tell donors they can “feed hungry children”, “stop human trafficking” or “give twice the hope”, you make them the hero. This engages a “storytelling switch” that triggers a rush of cortisol and oxytocin throughout their body: Cortisol focuses your attention on a problem that needs solving (feeding hungry children). Oxytocin magnifies your feelings of empathy, caring, and love. Can brain chemistry really increase fundraising results? Short answer: Yes. Every. Single. Time. Stories are powerful because they transport us into other people’s worlds but, in doing that, they change the way our brains work and potentially change our brain chemistry. – Paul Zak In fact, the release of these two chemicals are actually predictors of giving behavior. Stories increase fundraising results! Researchers in one study concluded is that story structure (hook, problem, payoff) kicks off the chemistry associated with giving.

[https://www.thecompassforsbc.org/sites/default/files/project_examples/My%20Island%20-%20Scriptwriters%20Guide%20-%20HIVAIDS%5B4%5D.pdf] - - public:weinreich
entertainment_education, storytelling - 2 | id:234069 -

To provide technical advice to the scriptwriters of Callaloo to help translate science to relevant messages and actions to address knowledge, attitude and behavior changes in the key results areas. Building the knowledge, shifting attitudes and ultimately changing behaviors will support reaching the objectives of the program. The following HIV/AIDS scriptwriters guide has been developed based on the results of the knowledge, attitude and behavior change (KAB) baseline survey conducted between January to March 2012 and supplemented by current research conducted by key partners (Refer to Sources of Information).

[https://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/opinion/sunday/the-neuroscience-of-your-brain-on-fiction.html?pagewanted=all] - - public:weinreich
storytelling - 1 | id:232148 -

The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto (and a published novelist), has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that “runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run on computers.” Fiction — with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions — offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people’s thoughts and feelings.

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2922522/] - - public:weinreich
storytelling - 1 | id:232147 -

Verbal communication is a joint activity; however, speech production and comprehension have primarily been analyzed as independent processes within the boundaries of individual brains. Here, we applied fMRI to record brain activity from both speakers and listeners during natural verbal communication. We used the speaker's spatiotemporal brain activity to model listeners’ brain activity and found that the speaker's activity is spatially and temporally coupled with the listener's activity. This coupling vanishes when participants fail to communicate. Moreover, though on average the listener's brain activity mirrors the speaker's activity with a delay, we also find areas that exhibit predictive anticipatory responses. We connected the extent of neural coupling to a quantitative measure of story comprehension and find that the greater the anticipatory speaker–listener coupling, the greater the understanding. We argue that the observed alignment of production- and comprehension-based processes serves as a mechanism by which brains convey information.

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