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[https://www.l2inc.com/best-practices-for-dark-testing-on-facebook/2016/blog] - - public:weinreich
advertising, social_network - 2 | id:76293 -

For review, “dark testing” is A/B testing on Facebook conducted by 1) building multiple variations of a single post by adjusting the message, thumbnail, image, etc., 2) serving these variations to different, similar audiences, and 3) measuring performance and designating a “winner.”

[https://hbr.org/2016/09/the-elements-of-value] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, marketing, target_audience, theory - 4 | id:76297 -

The amount and nature of value in a particular product or service always lie in the eye of the beholder, of course. Yet universal building blocks of value do exist, creating opportunities for companies to improve their performance in current markets or break into new ones. A rigorous model of consumer value allows a company to come up with new combinations of value that its products and services could deliver. The right combinations, our analysis shows, pay off in stronger customer loyalty, greater consumer willingness to try a particular brand, and sustained revenue growth. We have identified 30 “elements of value”—fundamental attributes in their most essential and discrete forms. These elements fall into four categories: functional, emotional, life changing, and social impact. Some elements are more inwardly focused, primarily addressing consumers’ personal needs. For example, the life-changing element motivation is at the core of Fitbit’s exercise-tracking products. Others are outwardly focused, helping customers interact in or navigate the external world. The functional element organizes is central to The Container Store and Intuit’s TurboTax, because both help consumers deal with complexities in their world.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKP5hI2MhBI] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:76302 -

Max Bazerman, co-director of the Center for Public Leadership; Odette van de Riet, Leader of BIT IenM, the Behavioral Insight Team of the Netherlands Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment; and David Halpern, Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights Team and Board Director of the Office of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, joined moderator Iris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy at HKS and Director of the Women and Public Policy Program, and co-Director of the Behavioral Insights Group, in a conversation on behavioral insights. The panel discussed its experiences applying behavioral economics findings, such as "nudge" techniques, to issues of public interest.

[https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160913100605.htm] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:76304 -

Underpinned by reinforcement learning, a fundamental theory of the dynamics of behavior change, BCD also incorporates theories about the evolution of behavioral control and human motivation, and a revised version of 'behavior settings' theory which helps explain the relationship between individuals and the environment. These theories suggest that, in order to change specific behaviors, interventions must create surprise, revalue the target behavior and facilitate performance of the changed behavior by modifying the environment in which it takes place. BCD involves a process for designing such interventions that follows five steps: Assess, Build, Create, Deliver, and Evaluate.

[http://catalyst.nejm.org/applying-behavioral-insights-improve-health-care/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:76306 -

BIT uses a simple framework to apply behavioral science to policy: in order to encourage a behavior, make it Easy, Attractive, Social, and Timely (EAST). The sections below give some examples of how this framework can be applied to improve health and health care. Many of these initiatives were tested through low-cost randomized controlled trials; we believe that such trials could be used much more by health care providers and policymakers to improve their everyday activities.

[http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/10/30/peds.2013-2037] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:76317 -

Parents had significantly higher odds of resisting vaccine recommendations if the provider used a participatory rather than a presumptive initiation format (adjusted odds ratio: 17.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2–253.5). When parents resisted, 50% of providers pursued their original recommendations (eg, “He really needs these shots”), and 47% of initially resistant parents subsequently accepted recommendations when they did.

[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/866456_3] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, target_audience - 2 | id:76327 -

One author has developed a practical approach to categorizing vaccine-hesitant parents into five groups, depending on the source and strength of their vaccine beliefs[9]: "Uninformed but educable" parents have been influenced by friends and relatives who have planted doubts about the safety of vaccines. They are unsure whether these messages are accurate and seek correct information and reassurance. "Misinformed but correctable" parents have heard only antivaccine messages, predominantly from media sources. They are open to provaccine messages and accurate information. "Well-read and open-minded" parents have researched pro- and antivaccine messages. They seek advice from a healthcare provider to assess the merits of the arguments and put them in a proper context. "Convinced and contented" parents have strong antivaccine views and go to the provider, sometimes owing to pressure from a family member, to listen to the other side of the argument. Although this group may change their attitudes over time, the chances of complete success are low. "Committed and missionary" parents hold firmly entrenched antivaccine views and may try and convince the provider to agree with them.

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