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[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/behavioural-and-social-sciences-to-enhance-the-efficacy-of-health-promotion-interventions-redesigning-the-role-of-professionals-and-people/01655ECBEE06104DF2D35C61E2A62BC3/core-read] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, sample_campaigns - 4 | id:283092 -

applying behavioral science to health promotion

[https://ethn.io/incentives/calculator?ref=uxdesignweekly] - - public:weinreich
research - 1 | id:283091 -

Calculate appropriate amount of incentives for research participants by country, cost of living, type of research, time to complete, etc.

[https://www.ucl.ac.uk/behaviour-change/abc-guides] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, government, how_to - 3 | id:283040 -

Commissioned by Public Health England's Behavioural Insights team (PHEBI), the CBC is excited to announce the completion of user-friendly guides to using the Behaviour Change Wheel, aimed at national and local government. The new guide provides a structured approach and can be used to help: develop behaviour change interventions, build on modify existing interventions, and choose from existing or planned interventions.

[https://measured.design/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, sample_campaigns, strategy - 4 | id:283028 -

MeasureD is a resource for anyone wanting to understand, measure, and scale the impact of social design in order to strengthen society and create the conditions for equitable human health. It is intended to represent the highest level of practice and help organizations and practitioners understand where, when, and how social design is most effective. includes case studies

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272494419308011] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, marketing, nutrition, social_marketing - 5 | id:281079 -

We tested how reframing the name of the vegetarian food category shapes food choices. • Environmental, social, and neutral (vs. vegetarian) frames boosted vegetarian choice. • No consistent differences emerged among the three non-vegetarian frames. • We investigated the underlying psychological mechanisms behind the main effects.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0956797617714579] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:281078 -

This meta-analysis began with a review of relevant literature on the perseverance of attitudes and beliefs and then assessed the impact of moderators on the misinformation, debunking, and misinformation-persistence effects. Compared with results from single experiments, meta-analysis is a useful catalogue of experimental paradigms, dependent variables, moderators, and other methods factors used in studies in related domains. In light of our findings, we offer three recommendations: (a) reduce arguments that support misinformation, (b) engage audiences in scrutiny and counterarguing of misinformation, and (c) introduce new information as part of the debunking message.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/paid-social-worth-investment-wes-finley/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, management, social_media - 3 | id:281059 -

Often, a Facebook page with no Fans can drive greater visibility with $500 of investment than a page can achieve organically with 90 Million+ Fans. This Facebook campaign reaches 1.3 Million people and achieves 42,000 clicks through to a website for $643. Despite the declining ROI of organic content, surprisingly few brands actually promote their social posts regularly. And by ignoring this paid investment they waste time and money creating imagery and copy that will be seen by very few people.

[https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/feb/08/misinformation-coronavirus-contagious-infections?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Tweet] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, social_media - 2 | id:279220 -

To fully explain how viral content – and viruses – spread, we need to move away from the idea that outbreaks involve simple clockwork infections, passing along a chain from person to person to person until large numbers have been exposed. During the 2015 outbreak of the Mers coronavirus in South Korea, 82 out of 186 infections came from a single “superspreading event” in a hospital where an infected person was being treated. It’s not yet clear how common such superspreading is in the current outbreak, but we do know that these kinds of events are how information goes viral online; most outbreaks on Twitter are dominated by a handful of individuals or media outlets, which are responsible for a large proportion of transmission. If you heard about snake flu, you might have told a couple of friends; meanwhile, newspaper headlines were telling millions. When tackling disease outbreaks, health agencies often work to identify potential superspreading events, isolating infected individuals to prevent further transmission. However, this isn’t the only way to stop an outbreak. As well as tracking down people who are infectious, it’s possible to target broader social interactions that might amplify transmission. For example, many cities in China have recently closed schools, which can be hotspots for respiratory infections.

[http://irh.org/social-norms-exploration/] - - public:weinreich
how_to, social_norms - 2 | id:279118 -

IRH, with support from the USAID-funded Passages project and members from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-funded Learning Collaborative to Advance Normative Change, developed the Social Norms Exploration Tool (SNET), a participatory guide and set of tools to translate theory into practical guidance to inform a social norms exploration. Download the Social Norms Exploration Tool Step-by-step guidance, exercises, and templates in the toolkit can help program implementers: Understand social norms theory and concepts Prepare staff to identify and investigate social norms Engage community members using participatory learning exercises to 1) identify Reference Groups, and 2) explore social norms influencing behaviors of interest Analyze information with project team and communities Use findings to inform the design of norms-shifting activities and develop norms-focused evaluation tools

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/nudge-forgood/06BC9E9032521954E8325798390A998A] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:279117 -

Insights from the behavioural sciences are increasingly used by governments and other organizations worldwide to ‘nudge’ people to make better decisions. Furthermore, a large philosophical literature has emerged on the ethical considerations on nudging human behaviour that has presented key challenges for the area, but is regularly omitted from discussion of policy design and administration. We present and discuss FORGOOD, an ethics framework that synthesizes the debate on the ethics of nudging in a memorable mnemonic. It suggests that nudgers should consider seven core ethical dimensions: Fairness, Openness, Respect, Goals, Opinions, Options and Delegation. The framework is designed to capture the key considerations in the philosophical debate about nudging human behaviour, while also being accessible for use in a range of public policy settings, as well as training.

[https://medium.com/airbel/lessons-learned-from-the-intersection-of-behavioral-and-human-centered-design-in-humanitarian-work-60853f8a3fd4] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international - 3 | id:279115 -

This example demonstrates how the IRC’s Airbel Impact Lab integrates behavioral science and human-centered design to develop scalable solutions to humanitarian problems. On their own, these approaches have been leveraged in a variety of contexts across the world — what is unique about the Airbel approach is bringing them together.

[https://hbr.org/2020/02/how-digital-design-drives-user-behavior] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design, online_marketing, technology - 5 | id:279086 -

A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial incentives or marketing and education campaigns.

[https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-020-0818-9?WT.ec_id=NATHUMBEHAV-202001&mkt-key=005056B0331B1ED782F5E028C8C89C2C&sap-outbound-id=DE998B2EB6C2788D6E52B117E719376B45B763A0] - - public:weinreich
research, storytelling - 2 | id:279081 -

Every research paper tells a story, but the pressure to provide ‘clean’ narratives is harmful for the scientific endeavour.

[https://hbr.org/2019/11/breaking-down-the-barriers-to-innovation] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, organization - 3 | id:277240 -

Fortunately, it’s possible to “hack” this problem. Drawing on the behavioral-change literature and on our experiences working with dozens of global companies, including DBS, Southeast Asia’s biggest bank, we’ve devised a practical way to break bad habits that squelch innovation and to develop new ones that inspire it. Like most hacks, our approach isn’t expensive, though it does take time and energy. It involves setting up interventions we call BEANs, shorthand for behavior enablers, artifacts, and nudges. Behavior enablers are tools or processes that make it easier for people to do something different. Artifacts—things you can see and touch—support the new behavior. And nudges, a tactic drawn from behavioral science, promote change through indirect suggestion and reinforcement. Though the acronym may sound a bit glib, we’ve found that it’s simple and memorable in a way that’s useful for organizations trying to develop better habits.

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