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[https://www.innovasjonnorge.no/no/subsites/hipnorway/tools-and-resources/] - - public:weinreich
design, how_to, management, partnerships, strategy - 5 | id:1125296 -

On this page we share practical tools and resources that may help humanitarian organisations in their efforts to innovate in partnership with the private sector. Publisert 29 nov 2019 Tools for innovative procurement Step by step guide to innovation friendly procurement This guide developed with TINKR and The National Programme for Supplier Development takes you through the different steps of doing an innovation-friendly procurement process in the humanitarian sector Click her to download. Tools for needs assessment Needs checklist: This checklist is a tool to evaluate if you have done relevant activities to understand as much as possible about the need/problem you are trying to solve before you move on to the market dialogue. Click here to download. Needs matrix: This matrix will help you to describe the needs your project is trying to solve and translate these into criteria you can use in your tender announcement. Click here to download. Template for invitation to market dialogue This is a template that you can use when you are inviting the private sector to a market dialogue: Click here to download. Planning template for market dialogue This template will guide you through the steps of planning and executing a market dialogue. Click here to download. Example of an innovation friendly procurement process from the humanitarian sector (The DIGID project) This is a summary of the innovation firendly procurement process conducted by The Humanitarian Innovation Platform in the DIGID project. Click here to download. Resources from the DIGID project The Humanitarian Innovaiton Platform, consisting of four Norwegian NGOs, have gathered useful resources like call for proposals document, concept note template, etc. from their innovation friendly procurement process. Go to this page to download other resources. Tools for scaling innovations Scaling model, by Tinkr This report presents the key elements of a scaling framework developed in a collaboration between Tinkr and the Norwegian Red Cross. Click here to download the scaling impact model. Tool for scaling, by Tinkr This tool will help you reflect on the scaling potential for your innovation, formulate your scaling ambition, consider which contextual factors and differences will be key to addressing in our project, and what interventions and stakeholders you can engage throughout the project to increase our likeliness of succeeding with scaling. Click here to download PPT version, and here to download PDF version. The scaling scan, by PPP Lab The scaling scan is apractical tool to determine the strengths and weaknesses of your scaling ambition. Click here to download the scaling scan. Tools for business models and IP Tools for sustainable business models Register here to receive three useful tools for sustainable business models, developed by Reodor Innovation Studios. Presentation on intellectual property What are intangible assets and IP/IPR? How can IP be protected and used? Why does IP matter? Presentation by IP expert Felipe Aguilera-Børresen. Download presentation here. Tools for communications Communications Strategy Canvas: The canvas will help you kick start your communicaitons strategy for your innovation project. Click here to download. Article on communications in innovation projects Click here to read. Social media quick tips The article provides some useful tips on how you can use social media to spark engagement about your innovation projects. Click here to read. Reports Background paper for the conference “Innovative Financing – Business models for sustainable humanitarian action“, organized by Innovation Norway and KPMG on 27th of November 2019*. Click here to download. “Leveraging the private sector in the field of protection“. Report by Oxford Research for Innovation Norway*. Click here to download. “Humanitarian organisation's use of pro bono services in innovation projects“ - Report by KPMG for Innovation Norway*. Click here to download.

[https://bridges.monash.edu/articles/chapter/Chapter_12_Making_the_most_of_an_effective_intervention/17090318] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:1031184 -

In this chapter we explore three approaches to ensuring that an effective intervention does lead to impact: they are scaling, dissemination, and knowledge translation. Each pathway can increase your impact - i.e., desired behaviour and societal change - but approach this goal from different directions and with emphasis on different activities and outputs. We will introduce you to the three approaches before deep diving into when and how to apply each approach.

[http://revistas.unisinos.br/index.php/sdrj/article/view/sdrj.2021.141.12] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:1031181 -

On the whole, however, these behavioral interventions have been somewhat underwhelming, exposing an inherent brittleness that comes from three common “errors of projection” in current behavioral design methodology: projected stability, which insufficiently plans for the fact that interventions often function within inherently unstable systems; projected persistence, which neglects to account for changes in those system conditions over time; and projected value, which assumes that definitions of success are universally shared across contexts. Borrowing from strategic design and futures thinking, a new proposed strategic foresight model—behavioral planning—can help practitioners better address these system-level, anticipatory, and contextual weaknesses by more systematically identifying potential forces that may impact behavioral interventions before they have been implemented. Behavioral planning will help designers more effectively elicit signals indicating the emergence of forces that may deform behavioral interventions in emergent COVID-19 contexts, and promote “roughly right” directional solutions at earlier stages in solution development to better address system shifts.

[https://www.nngroup.com/articles/prioritization-methods/?utm_source=Alertbox&utm_campaign=78f636ba13-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_11_12_08_52_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7f29a2b335-78f636ba13-24361717] - - public:weinreich
how_to, management, strategy - 3 | id:958670 -

Prioritizing work into a roadmap can be daunting for UX practitioners. Prioritization methods base these important decisions on objective, relevant criteria instead of subjective opinions. This article outlines 5 methods for prioritizing work into a UX roadmap: Impact–effort matrix Feasibility, desirability, and viability scorecard RICE method MoSCoW analysis Kano model These prioritization methods can be used to prioritize a variety of “items,” ranging from research questions, user segments, and features to ideas, and tasks.

[https://medium.com/behavior-design-hub/applied-behavioral-science-a-four-part-model-48acde17b25f] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy, theory - 4 | id:802631 -

I propose a four-stage model below that balances an understanding that each part is essential with the need to break it down into units of work that can be spread across internal teams and external vendors when necessary. But be warned: each handoff increases the potential for loss, particularly when there is an incomplete understanding of the adjoining stages. A tightly integrated process managed by people who understand the end-to-end process will always have the greatest likelihood of creating meaningful behavior change; that we can name the parts should not detract from the need for a whole. Behavioral Strategy: the defining of a desired behavioral outcome, with population, motivation, limitations, behavior, and measurement all clearly demarcated. Plain version: figuring out what “works” and “worth doing” mean in behavioral terms by collaborating with stakeholders. Behavioral Insights: the discovery of observations about the pressures that create current behaviors, both quantitative and qualitative. Plain version: figure out why people would want to do the behavior and why they aren’t already by talking to them individually and observing their behavior at scale. Behavioral Design: the design of proposed interventions, based on behavioral insights, that may create the pre-defined behavioral outcome. Plain version: design products, processes, etc. to make the behavior more likely. Behavioral Impact Evaluation: the piloting (often but not always using randomized controlled trials) of behavioral interventions to evaluate to what extent they modify the existing rates of the pre-defined behavioral outcomes. Plain version: figure out whether the products, processes, etc. actually make the behavior more likely. Behavioral Science: combining all four of those processes. Plain version: behavior as an outcome, science as a process.

[https://movielabs.com/ontology-for-media-creation/] - - public:weinreich
management, media, strategy - 3 | id:795117 -

In order for the software that supports collaboration and automation in production workflows to interoperate, common data models and schemas for data exchange are needed. MovieLabs and its member studios developed it’s Ontology for Media Creation (OMC) to improve communication about workflows between people, organizations, and software. The OMC can serve as the underpinnings for that by providing consistent naming and definitions of terms, as well as ways to express how various concepts and components relate to one another in production workflows.

[https://hbr.org/2021/08/why-you-need-to-protect-your-sense-of-wonder-especially-now] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, management - 2 | id:770363 -

The cultivation of experiences of awe. Like gratitude and curiosity, awe can leave us feeling inspired and energized. It’s another tool in your toolkit and it’s now attracting increased attention due to more rigorous research.

[https://www.danielstillman.com/blog/three-essential-leadership-conversations-for-creative-transformation] - - public:weinreich
consulting, management, training - 3 | id:574194 -

Getting to a “center with no sides” state is great. This is where my coachee was trying to get her team to - thinking of solutions to their central, big hairy goal. But it doesn’t come for free...you have to build up to that conversation. First she had to get them to locate themselves as *in* vs outside the circle of the question. Once they were aligned with the goals...that’s where the magic of the third conversation comes in. Leading powerful, transformational change requires the ability to facilitate three essential conversations, to answer three key questions: What is in and what is out? Ie, what are we talking about and what are we not going to talk about? Who is in and who’s out? Are we all in? What is our center with no sides? Ie, what is the most central question we are hoping to solve together? How can we dance on the edge of possibility? Once we know what we are talking about, and our most central question, how can we look past what’s possible to solve this challenge?

[https://breakthroughactionandresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/guidelines-for-costing-sbc-interventions.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, management, price - 4 | id:574107 -

Costing is the process of data collection and analysis for estimating the cost of a health intervention. High-quality cost data on SBC are critical not only for developing budgets, planning, and assessing program proposals, but can also feed into advocacy, program prioritization, and agenda setting. To better serve these data needs, these guidelines aim to increase the quantity and quality of SBC costing information. By encouraging cost analysts to use a standardized approach based on widely accepted methodological principles, we expect the SBC Costing Guidelines to result in well-designed studies that measure cost at the outset, to allow assessment of cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost ratios1 for SBC programming. Such analyses could also potentially help advocates for SBC to better make the case for greater investment in SBC programming.2 These guidelines lay out a consistent set of methodological principles that reflect best practice and that can underpin any SBC costing effort.

[https://cennydd.com/blog/responsible-design-a-process-attempt] - - public:weinreich
ethics, management, product - 3 | id:573792 -

The most common question I get on responsible design: ‘How do I actually embed ethical considerations into our innovation process?’ (They don’t actually phrase it like that, but you know… trying to be concise.) Although I don’t love cramming a multifaceted field like ethics into a linear diagram, it’s helpful to show a simple process map. So here’s my attempt.

[https://outofowls.com/blog/dragonmapping] - - public:weinreich
consulting, management, strategy - 3 | id:573790 -

TL;DR: A framework for having hard conversations with stakeholders and teams. Especially useful where there’s disagreement on what you’re doing, why you’re doing it, prioritisation, and what success looks like. You should be able to get people using this in 10 minutes or less.

[https://www.tech-transformed.com/product-development/] - - public:weinreich
ethics, how_to, management, product - 4 | id:488643 -

Consequence Scanning – an agile practice for Responsible Innovators A timely new business practice; Consequence Scanning fits alongside other agile practices in an iterative development cycle. This is a dedicated time and process for considering the potential consequences of what you’re creating

[https://www.sessionlab.com/] - - public:weinreich
conference, consulting, management, training - 4 | id:351439 -

SessionLab is the dynamic way to design your workshop and collaborate with your co-facilitators The most intuitive session planning system for facilitators, consultants and trainers. Design facilitation plans collaboratively, share professional-looking agendas with your clients and have a shared knowledge base within your team.

[https://medium.com/@dastillman/facilitation-means-designing-conversations-24bac966076e] - - public:weinreich
conference, consulting, creativity, design, management, training - 6 | id:350958 -

5Es of Experience Design: ENTICE, ENTER, ENGAGE, EXIT, EXTEND When you design a meeting as an experience, keep the 5Es framework as 5 “phases” of the experience in mind. Ask yourself: How might I entice people to join the meeting, how to get them to enter the conversation, how best to engage the participants, how to exit on the right note and how to extend the action to maintain momentum. I’ll guide you through these five phases with tools and case studies, so you can apply them at your work.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/cutting_through_the_complexity_a_roadmap_for_effective_collaboration#] - - public:weinreich
management, partnerships, strategy - 3 | id:350254 -

Launching and sustaining effective collaborations and networks requires that we pay constant attention to five activities: Clarifying purpose Convening the right people Cultivating trust Coordinating existing activities Collaborating for systems impact

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