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[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/really-best-way-start-meeting-steve-martin/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, management - 2 | id:251670 -

Whoever is in charge of hosting the meeting, or the most senior person in the room, should take responsibility for introducing everyone. Doing so neatly sidesteps both the aforesaid problems. Any awkwardness Claire in procurement feels about mentioning her experience and expertise in a relevant issue the meeting will address is deftly deflected. Second, the procurement department’s hi-flyer is now better placed to listen to the experience and expertise of others in the room, without worrying that her turn to speak is rapidly approaching.

[https://amp.usatoday.com/amp/2787560002?utm_source=Non-Obvious+Newsletter+-+Main+List&utm_campaign=e88c053fa2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_02_13_11_48&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f14a852876-e88c053fa2-56884485] - - public:weinreich
management, public_relations, social_media - 3 | id:241727 -

An industry rule of thumb, verified by USA TODAY through interviews with nearly a dozen influencers, marketing professionals and influencer platform founders, is a baseline rate of about 1 percent of follower counts per sponsored Instagram post, or $100 for every 10,000 followers. That means someone with 100,000 followers might start around $1,000 per sponsored post, while an influencer with 1 million followers could charge $10,000. And some experts called that conservative. Along with pricing structures based on follower counts, CPEs (cost per engagement) have emerged as another way to calculate marketing rates. Engagement is typically defined by interactions with content such as likes, comments, clicks or shares. Engagement rates can be found by adding up all engagements on a post, dividing it by follower counts and multiplying by 100.

[https://seths.blog/2019/01/opportunity-costs-just-went-up/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, management - 2 | id:234077 -

You’re about to spend 11 minutes perfecting an email to a customer. You could do a 90% ideal job in one minute, and the extra 10 minutes spent will increase the ‘quality’ of the email to 92%. The alternative? Now, you could spend that ten minutes reading a chapter of an important new book. You could learn a few new functions in Javascript. You could dive deep into the underlying economics of your new project…

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6-3-5_Brainwriting] - - public:weinreich
creativity, management, training - 3 | id:187498 -

In brief, it consists of 6 participants supervised by a moderator who are required to write down 3 ideas on a specific worksheet within 5 minutes, this is also the etymology of the methodology's name. The outcome after 6 rounds, during which participants swap their worksheets passing them on to the team member sitting at their right, is 108 ideas generated in 30 minutes.

[https://designsprintkit.withgoogle.com/introduction/overview] - - public:weinreich
design, how_to, management - 3 | id:187322 -

The Design Sprint Kit is an open-source resource for design leaders, product owners, developers or anyone who is learning about or running Design Sprints. Whether you are new to Design Sprints and gaining buy in for your first Sprint, or an experienced Sprint facilitator looking for new methods, this site will help you learn, plan, and contribute to the Design Sprint Methodology.

[http://www.arcusfoundation.org/publications/report-provides-insight-effecting-lasting-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, how_to, management, sample_campaigns, social_marketing - 5 | id:76388 -

This publication, designed as an open resource for grantees and the wider conservation and social justice movements, showcases the issues often faced by those in both sectors. It includes an overview of behavior change theories, a compilation of successful behavior change campaigns, lessons learned, and tools for planning new initiatives.

[https://medium.com/fluxx-studio-notes/how-watching-a-short-clip-from-a-tom-hanks-movie-saved-one-company-1-5-million-5fe3aebac7d0#.o3eqksdcm] - - public:weinreich
creativity, design, management - 3 | id:76510 -

Here’s one way to deal with things : show them a clip from the film Apollo 13. Specifically, the bit where the crew on board the lunar module are facing imminent suffocation due to a faulty air filter, so the scientists on the ground are forced to make a ‘square peg fit a round hole’ with whatever is available to the astronauts. I showed the clip to one client team I was working with, who were all blockers and no action. Before watching the clip the team was fatalistically resigned to business as usual. They didn’t like it, but they accepted it. Business as usual was a six month requirement gathering phase leading to a £1.5m bet on an unproven concept. After watching the clip, they built a working proof of concept within two hours, a fully fledged beta test within 6 weeks and ended up with an award-winning product that delights customers and is incredibly valuable to the business.

[https://hbr.org/2013/03/purpose-is-good-shared-purpose] - - public:weinreich
management, marketing, strategy - 3 | id:76543 -

But in a social age, this kind of purpose isn’t enough. The problem comes down to a simple preposition. Most leaders think of purpose as a purpose for. But what is needed is a purpose with. Customers are no longer just consumers; they’re co-creators. They aren’t just passive members of an audience; they are active members of a community. They want to be a part of something; to belong; to influence; to engage. It’s not enough that they feel good about your purpose. They want it to be their purpose too. They don’t want to be at the other end of your for. They want to be right there with you. Purpose needs to be shared.

[https://behavioralpolicy.org/what-makes-interventions-last/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:76592 -

"This is the question that Todd Rogers and I explore in our paper, “Persistence: How Treatment Effects Persist After Interventions Stop”, published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. We propose a framework for understanding how and when interventions may lead to persistent behavior change. Specifically, we identify four “pathways”, or features of interventions, that may explain why some interventions are successful at generating persistent behavior changes. These pathways include (1) habit formation, (2) changing what or how people think, (3) changing future costs, and (4) external reinforcement"

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