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[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/behavioural-and-social-sciences-to-enhance-the-efficacy-of-health-promotion-interventions-redesigning-the-role-of-professionals-and-people/01655ECBEE06104DF2D35C61E2A62BC3/core-read] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, sample_campaigns - 4 | id:283092 -

applying behavioral science to health promotion

[https://measured.design/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, sample_campaigns, strategy - 4 | id:283028 -

MeasureD is a resource for anyone wanting to understand, measure, and scale the impact of social design in order to strengthen society and create the conditions for equitable human health. It is intended to represent the highest level of practice and help organizations and practitioners understand where, when, and how social design is most effective. includes case studies

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/nudge-forgood/06BC9E9032521954E8325798390A998A] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:279117 -

Insights from the behavioural sciences are increasingly used by governments and other organizations worldwide to ‘nudge’ people to make better decisions. Furthermore, a large philosophical literature has emerged on the ethical considerations on nudging human behaviour that has presented key challenges for the area, but is regularly omitted from discussion of policy design and administration. We present and discuss FORGOOD, an ethics framework that synthesizes the debate on the ethics of nudging in a memorable mnemonic. It suggests that nudgers should consider seven core ethical dimensions: Fairness, Openness, Respect, Goals, Opinions, Options and Delegation. The framework is designed to capture the key considerations in the philosophical debate about nudging human behaviour, while also being accessible for use in a range of public policy settings, as well as training.

[https://medium.com/airbel/lessons-learned-from-the-intersection-of-behavioral-and-human-centered-design-in-humanitarian-work-60853f8a3fd4] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international - 3 | id:279115 -

This example demonstrates how the IRC’s Airbel Impact Lab integrates behavioral science and human-centered design to develop scalable solutions to humanitarian problems. On their own, these approaches have been leveraged in a variety of contexts across the world — what is unique about the Airbel approach is bringing them together.

[https://hbr.org/2020/02/how-digital-design-drives-user-behavior] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design, online_marketing, technology - 5 | id:279086 -

A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial incentives or marketing and education campaigns.

[https://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability-testing-101/?utm_source=Alertbox&utm_campaign=efe6ce0f84-UsabilityTesting_ServiceBlueprint_20191202&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7f29a2b335-efe6ce0f84-24361717] - - public:weinreich
design, product, qualitative, research - 4 | id:272148 -

[http://imaginari.es/new-metaphors/] - - public:weinreich
branding, creativity, design, health_communication, how_to - 5 | id:272145 -

Through a series of workshops in 2017–18, we’ve been exploring a process for generating new kinds of metaphors, and then using those metaphors to inspire concepts for new kinds of interface design which could potentially help people understand things in different ways. The intention of the workshops is that the process might be something designers can use or adapt for idea generation, or to provoke new kinds of thinking about interface design. The extent to which the metaphors merely provide initial ‘seed’ inspiration, or actually form the basis of the resulting design, varies. Download the New Metaphors cards, v.0.3 (February 2018) — 129 MB PDF, 300 dpi Download a poster/leaflet from Interaction 18 including thumbnails of all the cards, and a shortened version of this article — 2 MB PDF Download templates / worksheets — 400 kB PDF

[https://digitalwellbeing.org/the-10-advertising-strategies-that-work-the-advertising-effect-speed-summary/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, design - 3 | id:272054 -

Basically, it’s Nudge for advertisers. Outlining ten evidence-based effective advertising strategies, each with a scientific underpinning, Adam Ferrier (psychologist and founder of Naked) is up there with fellow Antipodean Byron Sharp in terms of must-reads for marketers. Ferrier is a fan of ‘Action Advertising’ – influencing people by influencing actions rather than perceptions. Drawing on the evidence that advertising is notoriously poor at direct persuasion, Ferrier outlines 10 ways to influence actions instead. The underlying logic is that the easiest way to persuade someone is to allow them to persuade themselves – and this will happen quite naturally if you prompt (nudge, spur) people to act in a way consistent with a desired behaviour. Why? Because we tend to align our perceptions with our actions to avoid the mental discomfort of cognitive dissonance. In other words, if you influence action, you influence perception. Moreover, because perception-change is only a means to an end, the end being behaviour-change (buy, buy more, buy for more) – Action Advertising orientates advertising to what really matters, actioning behaviour change. For Ferrier, advertising is and must be about behaviour change; ultimately if no behaviour is changed as a result of advertising, advertising is valueless.

[https://www.mdrc.org/publication/show-don-t-tell] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, training - 3 | id:271902 -

Sunstein and Thaler used the example of a high school cafeteria layout to demonstrate how small changes in our environment can influence our behavior, and we’ve discussed how a well-laid out office space can improve program participation rates. The example and our observations inspired MDRC’s Center for Behavioral Science (CABS) to create an interactive training session on the power of physical space to provide nudges. We asked training participants — staff at workforce development programs that help people find and keep employment — to try organizing their space with different goals in mind by designing a hypothetical high school cafeteria. Workshop participants received paper cut-out icons for all the essential materials — salads, hot food, snacks, desserts, beverages, cash registers, tables — and were asked to organize a logical cafeteria environment. But the directions had a catch. Each group received a unique goal: arrange the materials to maximize either: Healthy eating, Profits, or Efficiency.

[http://uxarchive.com/?ref=designtoolsweekly] - - public:weinreich
design, graphic_design, mobile - 3 | id:271281 -

UX Archive — collected the most interesting user flows that can help you analyze previous products and learn from others about what works and what doesn't. Examine tasks such as booking, logging in, onboarding, purchasing, searching, and more.

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