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[https://uxplanet.org/designing-emotional-ui-b11fa0fda5c] - - public:weinreich
design, product, technology - 3 | id:310211 -

Pyramid of Users' Needs - Aarron Walter, the author of Designing for Emotion, used a Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to create the pyramid of user needs. At the bottom of this pyramid, you can see the baseline characteristic of any product — functionality (does this product work?). Next comes reliability (is this product reliable?), usability (is this product easy to use?), and, finally, pleasurability (does this product makes us feel good when we use it?). Pleasurable products connect with users on an emotional level, and this feature makes them want to use it more and more.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/personalized-nudging/E854A04226DEA94B623ECA2ACF64C8D0/core-reader] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, target_audience - 3 | id:309764 -

Nudges have been critiqued for being too blunt of a tool. For instance, a retirement savings default may be helpful for a group of employees on average, but subgroups, say under-savers or over-savers, might be helped or harmed by this one-size-fits-all approach. As such, there have been calls to develop a more personalized approach to nudging (see here in our collection: “Imagining the Next Decade of Behavioral Science”). This paper outlines two dimensions that behavioral scientists could consider when designing personalized nudges: choice personalization and delivery personalization. Think of choice personalization as “personalization within nudges”—the method of nudge has been set (say, a default) but is tailored to specific individuals (different default leves of retirement contributions, for those over-savers and under-savers). Think of delivery personalization as “personalization as across nudges”—understanding the most effective method to nudge a certain individual. Personalizing nudges does come with data privacy and legal concerns, but these can be overcome, the paper argues.

[https://www.behaviourworksaustralia.org/behaviour-change-101-series-five-steps-to-select-the-right-behaviour-to-target/?utm_source=Habit+Weekly&utm_campaign=1f1cda8506-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_02_02_02_55_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ab93d31fb5-1f1cda85] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to, strategy, target_audience - 5 | id:285232 -

At BehaviourWorks, we often prioritise behaviours using the Impact-Likelihood Matrix (figure below). In this approach, behaviours are prioritised by mapping them based on: The impact they have on the problem they are intended to address. The likelihood of the target audience adopting the behaviour.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/behavioural-and-social-sciences-to-enhance-the-efficacy-of-health-promotion-interventions-redesigning-the-role-of-professionals-and-people/01655ECBEE06104DF2D35C61E2A62BC3/core-read] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, sample_campaigns - 4 | id:283092 -

applying behavioral science to health promotion

[https://measured.design/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, sample_campaigns, strategy - 4 | id:283028 -

MeasureD is a resource for anyone wanting to understand, measure, and scale the impact of social design in order to strengthen society and create the conditions for equitable human health. It is intended to represent the highest level of practice and help organizations and practitioners understand where, when, and how social design is most effective. includes case studies

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/nudge-forgood/06BC9E9032521954E8325798390A998A] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:279117 -

Insights from the behavioural sciences are increasingly used by governments and other organizations worldwide to ‘nudge’ people to make better decisions. Furthermore, a large philosophical literature has emerged on the ethical considerations on nudging human behaviour that has presented key challenges for the area, but is regularly omitted from discussion of policy design and administration. We present and discuss FORGOOD, an ethics framework that synthesizes the debate on the ethics of nudging in a memorable mnemonic. It suggests that nudgers should consider seven core ethical dimensions: Fairness, Openness, Respect, Goals, Opinions, Options and Delegation. The framework is designed to capture the key considerations in the philosophical debate about nudging human behaviour, while also being accessible for use in a range of public policy settings, as well as training.

[https://medium.com/airbel/lessons-learned-from-the-intersection-of-behavioral-and-human-centered-design-in-humanitarian-work-60853f8a3fd4] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international - 3 | id:279115 -

This example demonstrates how the IRC’s Airbel Impact Lab integrates behavioral science and human-centered design to develop scalable solutions to humanitarian problems. On their own, these approaches have been leveraged in a variety of contexts across the world — what is unique about the Airbel approach is bringing them together.

[https://hbr.org/2020/02/how-digital-design-drives-user-behavior] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design, online_marketing, technology - 5 | id:279086 -

A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial incentives or marketing and education campaigns.

[https://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability-testing-101/?utm_source=Alertbox&utm_campaign=efe6ce0f84-UsabilityTesting_ServiceBlueprint_20191202&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7f29a2b335-efe6ce0f84-24361717] - - public:weinreich
design, product, qualitative, research - 4 | id:272148 -

[http://imaginari.es/new-metaphors/] - - public:weinreich
branding, creativity, design, health_communication, how_to - 5 | id:272145 -

Through a series of workshops in 2017–18, we’ve been exploring a process for generating new kinds of metaphors, and then using those metaphors to inspire concepts for new kinds of interface design which could potentially help people understand things in different ways. The intention of the workshops is that the process might be something designers can use or adapt for idea generation, or to provoke new kinds of thinking about interface design. The extent to which the metaphors merely provide initial ‘seed’ inspiration, or actually form the basis of the resulting design, varies. Download the New Metaphors cards, v.0.3 (February 2018) — 129 MB PDF, 300 dpi Download a poster/leaflet from Interaction 18 including thumbnails of all the cards, and a shortened version of this article — 2 MB PDF Download templates / worksheets — 400 kB PDF

[https://digitalwellbeing.org/the-10-advertising-strategies-that-work-the-advertising-effect-speed-summary/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, design - 3 | id:272054 -

Basically, it’s Nudge for advertisers. Outlining ten evidence-based effective advertising strategies, each with a scientific underpinning, Adam Ferrier (psychologist and founder of Naked) is up there with fellow Antipodean Byron Sharp in terms of must-reads for marketers. Ferrier is a fan of ‘Action Advertising’ – influencing people by influencing actions rather than perceptions. Drawing on the evidence that advertising is notoriously poor at direct persuasion, Ferrier outlines 10 ways to influence actions instead. The underlying logic is that the easiest way to persuade someone is to allow them to persuade themselves – and this will happen quite naturally if you prompt (nudge, spur) people to act in a way consistent with a desired behaviour. Why? Because we tend to align our perceptions with our actions to avoid the mental discomfort of cognitive dissonance. In other words, if you influence action, you influence perception. Moreover, because perception-change is only a means to an end, the end being behaviour-change (buy, buy more, buy for more) – Action Advertising orientates advertising to what really matters, actioning behaviour change. For Ferrier, advertising is and must be about behaviour change; ultimately if no behaviour is changed as a result of advertising, advertising is valueless.

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