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[http://affectivebrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/41562_2019_793_OnlinePDF_2.pdf] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, mental_health, technology - 3 | id:277149 -

Immense amounts of information are now accessible to people, including information that bears on their past, present and future. An important research challenge is to determine how people decide to seek or avoid information. Here we propose a framework of information-seeking that aims to integrate the diverse motives that drive information-seeking and its avoidance. Our framework rests on the idea that information can alter people’s action, affect and cognition in both positive and negative ways. The suggestion is that people assess these influences and integrate them into a calculation of the value of information that leads to information-seeking or avoidance. The theory offers a framework for characterizing and quantifying individual differences in information-seeking, which we hypothesize may also be diagnostic of mental health. We consider biases that can lead to both insufficient and excessive information-seeking. We also discuss how the framework can help government agencies to assess the welfare effects of mandatory information disclosure.

[https://www.thegoodmancenter.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/freerange_2020_01.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, storytelling - 3 | id:277022 -

And as to the central question of using both fear and hope: “I think we're in a moment where fear is a stronger motivator than hope,“ Parfrey began. “I'm looking at the evidence. I'm looking at Greta Thunberg. There is a tinge of the apocalypse in her framing.“ But Parfrey was quick to add that fear, by itself, isn't the only button to press. “The data is clear on this,“ he said. “The more dire the messages sound, the more individuals will tuneout. And I say this with full-knowledge that the climate picture is dire. You have to be honest, you have to present the sobering information, yet we still have the choice before us to dramatically improve the situation or make it worse. The choice is still ours.“

[https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/opinion/2019/12/03/ebola-epidemic-Congo-language-communication] - - public:weinreich
ethics, health_communication - 2 | id:272172 -

Fifteen months into the Democratic Republic of Congo’s latest Ebola outbreak, we are still asking people to overcome the fear of an indiscriminate disease and accept an intimidating medical process while communicating in a way that often creates confusion and frustration.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/communicating_complexity_in_the_humanitarian_sector] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, storytelling - 2 | id:272154 -

these four questions before crafting our internal communications strategy: What do we want to change? What do we want to be true that isn’t true right now? Whose behavior change is necessary to making that happen? Who has to do something (or stop doing something) they’re not doing now for us to achieve that goal? (This is about targeting a narrowly defined audience whose action or behavioral change is fundamental to your goal.) What would that individual or group believe if they took that action? In other words, what does that narrowly defined audience care about most, and how can we include that in our messages? How will we get that message in front of them? Where are their eyes?

[http://imaginari.es/new-metaphors/] - - public:weinreich
branding, creativity, design, health_communication, how_to - 5 | id:272145 -

Through a series of workshops in 2017–18, we’ve been exploring a process for generating new kinds of metaphors, and then using those metaphors to inspire concepts for new kinds of interface design which could potentially help people understand things in different ways. The intention of the workshops is that the process might be something designers can use or adapt for idea generation, or to provoke new kinds of thinking about interface design. The extent to which the metaphors merely provide initial ‘seed’ inspiration, or actually form the basis of the resulting design, varies. Download the New Metaphors cards, v.0.3 (February 2018) — 129 MB PDF, 300 dpi Download a poster/leaflet from Interaction 18 including thumbnails of all the cards, and a shortened version of this article — 2 MB PDF Download templates / worksheets — 400 kB PDF

[https://www.ahrq.gov/ncepcr/tools/self-mgmt/pemat.html] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, health_communication - 2 | id:272090 -

The Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) is a systematic method to evaluate and compare the understandability and actionability of patient education materials. It is designed as a guide to help determine whether patients will be able to understand and act on information. Separate tools are available for use with print and audiovisual materials.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/lessons_for_social_change_communications_strategy_from_the_us_marriage_equality_and_antismoking_campaigns] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, social_change, social_norms, tobacco - 5 | id:272045 -

Aspirational Communication, an approach that seeks to motivate and mobilize people to support a cause by connecting it to the audience’s aspirations for their own lives. I specifically suggest a six-step framework based on the approach that can help social movements to drive durable attitude change.

[https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/11/18/the-benefits-and-risks-of-public-awareness-campaigns-world-antibiotic-awareness-week-in-context/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, health_communication - 3 | id:272021 -

the report sits uncomfortably with evidence that information needs vary across contexts; a 2018 review of awareness raising interventions across different target populations found success varied markedly. [11] The same message that will draw attention from policy makers may not resonate with the public and care providers around the world.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/communicating_complexity_in_the_humanitarian_sector?utm_campaign=meetedgar&utm_medium=social&utm_source=meetedgar.com] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, international, storytelling, strategy - 4 | id:272001 -

We realized we were using insider language to describe innovation (as exemplified by internal blog post titles like “Using GIS Technology to Map Shelter Allocation in Azraq Refugee Camp”), rather than communicating what innovation looks like and the benefits it would bring to UNHCR staff (for example, “How UNHCR Used Creativity to Improve Journalistic Accuracy and Collaboration, One Step at a Time”). So, we hit the reset button and asked ourselves these four questions before crafting our internal communications strategy: What do we want to change? What do we want to be true that isn’t true right now? Whose behavior change is necessary to making that happen? Who has to do something (or stop doing something) they’re not doing now for us to achieve that goal? (This is about targeting a narrowly defined audience whose action or behavioral change is fundamental to your goal.) What would that individual or group believe if they took that action? In other words, what does that narrowly defined audience care about most, and how can we include that in our messages? How will we get that message in front of them? Where are their eyes?

[https://narrativeinitiative.org/blog/explanation-how-narrative] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, social_change, storytelling - 4 | id:271989 -

Released in March as part of FrameWorks Institute’s 20th anniversary, the Explanation Declaration asks communicators to help people understand the “how” behind issues and see that how as a critical part of engaging and empowering people to take action.

[https://medium.com/bending-the-arc/the-science-of-belief-move-beyond-us-and-them-to-we-877a5d714a9c] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, social_change, storytelling - 3 | id:271901 -

News media often frame refugees as a burden or threat to a community, where humanitarian stories often frame refugees as helpless people in a far-off land in need of help. Both narratives — while sympathetic — consistently situate refugees as outsiders. Our job as communicators is to shift the narrative from “us” and “them” to “we.”

[http://fakenews.publicdatalab.org/] - - public:weinreich
ethics, health_communication, research, social_media, social_network - 5 | id:271300 -

A Field Guide to “Fake News” and Other Information Disorders explores the use of digital methods to study false viral news, political memes, trolling practices and their social life online. It responds to an increasing demand for understanding the interplay between digital platforms, misleading information, propaganda and viral content practices, and their influence on politics and public life in democratic societies.

[http://davetrott.co.uk/2019/10/facts-create-emotion/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, marketing - 2 | id:271280 -

done properly, facts provoke emotion better than emotion provokes emotion. Because facts are believable, whereas a display of emotion feels like manipulation. And the first emotion we want to provoke is believability.

[https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3474998&download=yes] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:269648 -

Participants whose stated preference was to follow the doctor’s opinion had significantly lower rates of antibiotic requests when given “information first, then opinion” compared to “opinion first, then information.” Our evidence suggests that “information first, then opinion” is the most effective approach. We hypothesize that this is because it is seen by non-experts as more trustworthy and more respectful of their autonomy.

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/tech-happy-life/201910/how-do-you-win-argument] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, strategy - 3 | id:267094 -

Well, if we want to sway other people to our “correct“ vision of things, we are most likely to do that by having a strong relationship with them. Ironically, it is through carefully and compassionately listening to others that we are more likely to sway their views.

[https://bbiasblog.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/attractive-names-of-the-meals-for-healthier-diets-of-the-children/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, branding, health_communication, obesity, youth - 5 | id:266972 -

Discarding classical solutions such as information campaigns, it offers a much simpler alternative: make the healthy options more tempting. How? By changing their names. Several research teams in the US have tried this strategy in various school canteens and they found that making the names “seductive”, catchy or funny can induce children to eat healthier.

[https://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2017/02/27/why-the-american-public-seems-allergic-to-facts/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:266970 -

There is more than one reason this is happening. But, one reason I think the alternative facts industry has been so effective has to do with a concept social scientists call the “backfire effect.” As a rule, misinformed people do not change their minds once they have been presented with facts that challenge their beliefs. But, beyond simply not changing their minds when they should, research shows that they are likely to become more attached to their mistaken beliefs. The factual information “backfires.” When people don’t agree with you, research suggests that bringing in facts to support your case might actually make them believe you less. In other words, fighting the ill-informed with facts is like fighting a grease fire with water. It seems like it should work, but it’s actually going to make things worse.

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