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[https://www.userinterviews.com/blog/thinking-styles-research-indi-young] - - public:weinreich
design, marketing, research, strategy, target_audience - 5 | id:1489288 -

But she did explain how researching and designing for the majority or “average user” actually end up ignoring, othering, and harming the people our designs are meant to serve. Indi shared how she finds patterns in people’s behaviors, thoughts, and needs—and how she uses that data to create thinking styles that inform more inclusive design decisions. Indi talked about… Why researchers should look for patterns, not anecdotes, to understand real user needs. What are thinking styles and how to uncover and use them. Why your “average” user often doesn’t exist in the real world, and how we can do better.

[https://www.marketingweek.com/ritson-marketers-creativity/] - - public:weinreich
creativity, inspiration, marketing, strategy - 4 | id:1461459 -

“One of the greatest gifts strategists can give themselves is the humility to appreciate that tactical ideas are neither their strength nor their responsibility. Setting up goals and scoring them are two very different things. To do one well you usually need to ignore the other. ...Strategy is not lesser than creativity, because it pre-empts and prepares it for victory. A brand must travel through the confusing forests of targeting, positioning and objectives before it can set up camp on the fertile field of creativity.“

[https://hbr.org/2016/09/the-elements-of-value?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hbr&utm_source=twitter&tpcc=orgsocial_edit] - - public:weinreich
branding, design, inspiration, marketing, product, theory - 6 | id:1266389 -

We have identified 30 “elements of value”—fundamental attributes in their most essential and discrete forms. These elements fall into four categories: functional, emotional, life changing, and social impact. Some elements are more inwardly focused, primarily addressing consumers’ personal needs.

[https://stratechery.com/2020/the-idea-adoption-curve/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, marketing, social_change, technology, theory - 5 | id:438382 -

The key in all this is crossing the chasm—performing the acts that allow the first shoots of that mainstream market to emerge. This is a do-or-die proposition for high-tech enterprises; hence it is logical that they be the crucible in which “chasm theory” is formed. But the principles can be generalized to other forms of marketing, so for the general reader who can bear with all the high-tech examples in this book, useful lessons may be learned.

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272494419308011] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, marketing, nutrition, social_marketing - 5 | id:281079 -

We tested how reframing the name of the vegetarian food category shapes food choices. • Environmental, social, and neutral (vs. vegetarian) frames boosted vegetarian choice. • No consistent differences emerged among the three non-vegetarian frames. • We investigated the underlying psychological mechanisms behind the main effects.

[http://davetrott.co.uk/2019/10/facts-create-emotion/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, marketing - 2 | id:271280 -

done properly, facts provoke emotion better than emotion provokes emotion. Because facts are believable, whereas a display of emotion feels like manipulation. And the first emotion we want to provoke is believability.

[https://www.reachsolutions.co.uk/sites/default/files/2019-07/The%20Empathy%20Delusion%20final.pdf] - - public:weinreich
advertising, ethics, marketing, target_audience - 4 | id:266000 -

To explore advertising and marketing’s capacity for empathy, we’ve turned to cutting edge moral psychology. In this white paper we are asking people working in the advertising and marketing industry to consider the deepest questions about their identity, ethics and morals.

[https://peoplescience.maritz.com/Articles/2019/Its-Time-For-Consumer-Romance] - - public:weinreich
marketing, theory - 2 | id:265977 -

If marketers were all playing a fantasy nerd version of rock-paper-scissors, then “heart” would almost always beat “head.”

[https://thebehavioursagency.com/richard-shotton-behavioural-science-marketing/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, marketing, social_norms - 5 | id:255764 -

Consider three levels: literal, liberal & lateral. Example: social proof... Literal: share the percentage of people who follow the norm in general Liberal: tailor the claims to what “people like them“ do Lateral: suggest popularity rather than stating it

[http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/five-marketing-lessons-from-the-payless-shoe-store-prank/?platform=hootsuite] - - public:weinreich
branding, marketing - 2 | id:229156 -

The prank says something very powerful about consumer behavior: When it comes to quality, perception is reality. The shoppers believed they were purchasing luxury footwear because they were fed an array of social and environmental cues, not because of the shoes themselves.

[http://asburyandasbury.com/blog/2016/11/8/conversation-my-arse] - - public:weinreich
advertising, branding, marketing, product, social_media - 5 | id:229099 -

Andrex has become a great case study in modern marketing, because it represents the logical outcome of two dominant trends: the mission escalation trend and the conversation trend. Both are waves of brand thinking that have swept all before them in recent years, and it’s not exactly Andrex’s fault that they have been caught up in it. It’s just that the nature of their business means stretching both trends to breaking point. First, there’s the mission escalation trend. This is the homeopathy of marketing. It involves taking the functional purpose of any given product, diluting it to a slightly more abstract level, then diluting it again and repeating the process until you reach a level of abstraction so remote that any sense of specific purpose has been lost entirely. So if your product is a bar of chocolate, it’s not about giving people something chocolatey to eat, it’s about giving them a tasty treat. And it’s not about giving them a tasty treat, it’s about giving them a treat in a wider sense. And it’s not about the treat as such, but the enjoyment you get from that treat. And it’s not about the physical enjoyment, but the emotional enjoyment. And it’s not about the emotional enjoyment, but joy itself. And it’s not about experiencing joy, it’s about believing in joy. And now your brand purpose is more closely aligned to Buddhism than it is to chocolate.

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