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[https://surgoventures.org/newsroom-all/analysis-us-general-population-survey-on-covid-19-vaccine-uptake] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy, target_audience - 3 | id:684174 -

The five psychobehavioral segments of Americans Surgo identified from its survey are: 1. The “Enthusiasts” (40% of the U.S. population). Every person in this group said they would get the vaccine as soon as it is made available to them. There are no barriers to vaccination 1 for people in this group—in fact, the key challenge will be ensuring vaccine supply meets their demand before they lose enthusiasm, as we’re seeing now as people struggle to sign up. 2. The “Watchful” (20% of the U.S. population). For this segment, social norms are important: Before they get the shot themselves, people in this segment first need to see that others in their peer group or community are getting vaccinated and having safe, positive experiences. 3. The “Cost-Anxious” (14% of the U.S. population). For this segment, time and costs are the primary barriers to getting the vaccine. Every member of this group reports having delayed seeking care for their health in the past due to the expense. The irony: Only 28% of people in this group lack health insurance, indicating that their concerns about costs override having insurance to cover them. 4. The “System Distrusters” (9% of the U.S. population). This group primarily believes that people of their own race are not treated fairly by the health system. Members of this group are likely to belong to, but are not exclusively, communities of color. There are multiple, complicated barriers for this segment, but most of them are related to trust in and access to a health system that has an inequitable history. 5. The “Conspiracy Believers” (17% of the population). This segment has perceived barriers around COVID-19 vaccination that Surgo believes are simply too hard to shift in the short term. It includes people who don't believe in vaccines in general, but the primary barrier for people in this group is their very specific and deeply-held beliefs around COVID-19. Every person in this group believes in at least one conspiracy theory: ○ 84% believe that COVID-19 is exploited by government to control people ○ 65% believe COVID-19 was caused by a ring of people who secretly manipulate world events ○ 36% believe microchips are implanted with the COVID-19 vaccine The three most persuadable psychobehavioral segments Surgo recommends prioritizing are the “Watchful”, “Cost-Anxious” and “System Distrusters” for maximum benefit. Each segment has specific barriers to overcome:...

[https://therealalexa.com/accessible-social] - - public:weinreich
design, graphic_design, social_media, target_audience - 4 | id:573776 -

Accessibility on Social Media So you want to be more inclusive online? Excellent! Whether you're looking to improve your personal social media or accounts that you manage professionally, there are a lot of basic best practices you can implement to make your online presence more accessible. Ultimately, this makes a big impact on the experience that users with vision and/or hearing disabilities have on social media. Below you will find tips, tricks, and information on digital accessibility. These resources are by no means exhaustive, but are a good starting place for creating accessible and more inclusive social media content. I've also put together a quick and handy checklist to help you double-check the content you create for common accessibility pitfalls.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/personalized-nudging/E854A04226DEA94B623ECA2ACF64C8D0/core-reader] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, target_audience - 3 | id:309764 -

Nudges have been critiqued for being too blunt of a tool. For instance, a retirement savings default may be helpful for a group of employees on average, but subgroups, say under-savers or over-savers, might be helped or harmed by this one-size-fits-all approach. As such, there have been calls to develop a more personalized approach to nudging (see here in our collection: “Imagining the Next Decade of Behavioral Science”). This paper outlines two dimensions that behavioral scientists could consider when designing personalized nudges: choice personalization and delivery personalization. Think of choice personalization as “personalization within nudges”—the method of nudge has been set (say, a default) but is tailored to specific individuals (different default leves of retirement contributions, for those over-savers and under-savers). Think of delivery personalization as “personalization as across nudges”—understanding the most effective method to nudge a certain individual. Personalizing nudges does come with data privacy and legal concerns, but these can be overcome, the paper argues.

[https://www.behaviourworksaustralia.org/behaviour-change-101-series-five-steps-to-select-the-right-behaviour-to-target/?utm_source=Habit+Weekly&utm_campaign=1f1cda8506-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_02_02_02_55_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ab93d31fb5-1f1cda85] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to, strategy, target_audience - 5 | id:285232 -

At BehaviourWorks, we often prioritise behaviours using the Impact-Likelihood Matrix (figure below). In this approach, behaviours are prioritised by mapping them based on: The impact they have on the problem they are intended to address. The likelihood of the target audience adopting the behaviour.

[https://www.asla.org/universaldesign.aspx] - - public:weinreich
design, environment, place, target_audience - 4 | id:266560 -

If we want everyone to participate in public life, we must design and build an inclusive public realm that is accessible to all. Public life can’t just be available to the abled, young, or healthy. Everyone navigates the built environment differently, with abilities changing across a person's lifespan. The sizeable global population of people with physical, auditory, or visual disabilities, autism or neurodevelopmental and/or intellectual disabilities, or neuro-cognitive disorders will face greater challenges if we don’t begin to more widely apply universal design principles.

[https://www.reachsolutions.co.uk/sites/default/files/2019-07/The%20Empathy%20Delusion%20final.pdf] - - public:weinreich
advertising, ethics, marketing, target_audience - 4 | id:266000 -

To explore advertising and marketing’s capacity for empathy, we’ve turned to cutting edge moral psychology. In this white paper we are asking people working in the advertising and marketing industry to consider the deepest questions about their identity, ethics and morals.

[https://underthebluedoor.org/2014/08/18/the-rwandan-prescription-for-depression-sun-drum-dance-community-we-had-a-lot-of-trouble-with-western-mental-health-workers-who-came-here-immediately-after-the-genocide-and-we-had-to-ask-some/?fbclid=IwAR2R4tbTOdJuE] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mental_health, social_norms, target_audience - 4 | id:264270 -

The Rwandan prescription for Depression: Sun, drum, dance, community. “We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave. They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better, there was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again, there was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy, there was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again. Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.” ~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression.

[https://wip.pubpub.org/collectivewisdom] - - public:weinreich
management, media, social_change, storytelling, target_audience - 5 | id:253344 -

Why co-create and why now? Collective Wisdom is a first-of-its-kind field study of the media industry, that maps works that live outside the limits of singular authorship. While the concept of co-creation is entering the zeitgeist, it is an ancient and under-reported dynamic. Media co-creation has particular relevance in the face of today’s myriad of challenges, such as the climate crisis and threats to democracy. But it is not without risks and complications. In this study we look at how people co-create within communities; across disciplines; and increasingly, with living systems and artificial intelligence (AI). We also synthesize the risks, as well as the practical lessons from the field on how to co-create with an ethos grounded in principles of equity and justice. This qualitative study reframes how culture is produced, and is a first step in articulating contemporary co-creative practices and ethics. In doing so, it connects unusual dots.

[https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1186/s12889-019-6696-2.pdf] - - public:weinreich
quantitative, research, target_audience - 3 | id:244100 -

The aim of this study was to establish if distinct segments were evident in a sexual health context drawing from measures sourced from four segmentation bases extending application of segmentation to all recommended bases [46]. This study indicates how researchers can use two-step cluster analysis to identify segments, which are represented by a group of individuals who share similar characteristics that differ from other groups in the larger heterogeneous target audience. Further, this study demonstrates how available information can be used delivering a dashboard to inform program design and planning.

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