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[https://uxplanet.org/designing-emotional-ui-b11fa0fda5c] - - public:weinreich
design, product, technology - 3 | id:310211 -

Pyramid of Users' Needs - Aarron Walter, the author of Designing for Emotion, used a Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to create the pyramid of user needs. At the bottom of this pyramid, you can see the baseline characteristic of any product — functionality (does this product work?). Next comes reliability (is this product reliable?), usability (is this product easy to use?), and, finally, pleasurability (does this product makes us feel good when we use it?). Pleasurable products connect with users on an emotional level, and this feature makes them want to use it more and more.

[https://www.elearningguild.com/insights/237/augmented-and-virtual-reality-for-behavior-change/?from=content&mode=filter&topic=39%2C38&showpage=7] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, storytelling, technology - 3 | id:285228 -

Augmented and virtual reality can be an incredible tool when it comes to practicing certain skills that may not be safe or realistic in real life. AR and VR technologies are radically changing L&D as an industry. This research report, Augmented and Virtual Reality for Behavior Change, by Julie Dirksen, Dustin DiTommaso, and Cindy Plunkett explores how AR and VR can be a great resource for behavior change. The report examines key research on this, centered on the following themes: Enabling the Behavior Empathy Building Experiencing Consequences Future Projection Feedback Emotional Self-Regulation Download this report to discover how AR and VR solutions are a useful investment for behavior change.

[https://hbr.org/2020/02/how-digital-design-drives-user-behavior] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design, online_marketing, technology - 5 | id:279086 -

A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial incentives or marketing and education campaigns.

[http://affectivebrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/41562_2019_793_OnlinePDF_2.pdf] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, mental_health, technology - 3 | id:277149 -

Immense amounts of information are now accessible to people, including information that bears on their past, present and future. An important research challenge is to determine how people decide to seek or avoid information. Here we propose a framework of information-seeking that aims to integrate the diverse motives that drive information-seeking and its avoidance. Our framework rests on the idea that information can alter people’s action, affect and cognition in both positive and negative ways. The suggestion is that people assess these influences and integrate them into a calculation of the value of information that leads to information-seeking or avoidance. The theory offers a framework for characterizing and quantifying individual differences in information-seeking, which we hypothesize may also be diagnostic of mental health. We consider biases that can lead to both insufficient and excessive information-seeking. We also discuss how the framework can help government agencies to assess the welfare effects of mandatory information disclosure.

[https://digitalprinciples.org/wp-content/uploads/Context-Analysis_Framework_v3-1.pdf] - - public:weinreich
research, social_change, strategy, technology - 4 | id:271931 -

Context analysis helps you to understand the elements of an environment and a group of potential users so that you can design a better technology project. It should involve key stakeholders, including implementing partners, donors, local and national authorities, and community members. We suggest five key lines of inquiry that context analyses should consider: People: Levels of education and literacy, information habits and needs, access to disposable income for equipment, electrical power to charge devices, and airtime and data to run them, and network access; Community: How membership of specific groups may affect access to technology and communications habits. For example, a nomadic clan may have attributable characteristics shared by its members, and variations in levels of access and freedom within the clan differentiated by gender and age. Market environment: An understanding of the key players, legal and regulatory issues, the mobile market, including both cost and distribution of agent networks, and the infrastructure, including commercial mobile infrastructure such as the availability of short-codes and APIs are all critical to making good design decisions. Political environment: understanding governance and control of, and access to, communications infrastructure by government and other actors Implementing organization: Many interventions have failed because staff were not able to maintain technology, because power or access to internet were not strong enough, because staff capacity was low or went away, or because the intervention was not supported by a broader culture of innovation and adaptive learning.

[https://customer.io/blog/triggered-engagement-email-campaigns/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, online_marketing, technology - 4 | id:266958 -

When the growth team took a step back, they realized it wasn’t enough to trigger just any notification. They needed to “show the right things to users at the right time — creating ‘aha moments’” where the user experienced the product’s core value. Rather than indiscriminately bombard the user with notifications, they concluded that they needed to be “really thoughtful about which messages to send which users” and focus “more of [their] resources on engaging users that were likely to churn.” Taking a page from Facebook, here are 5 kinds of engagement messages that work to activate, retain, and grow customers. Highly personal and targeted, these emails show off your product’s core value, ferry your users to their “aha moments”, and get people engaging with your product and brand again and again.

[https://medium.com/googleplaydev/putting-back-users-to-the-forefront-sustainable-engagement-tips-from-behavioral-science-b9557af3da3e] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, mobile, technology - 4 | id:264227 -

Luckily, behavioral science can help close the intention-action gap, offering a toolkit to help change behavior for the better. Here are three ways we can apply lessons from behavioral science to drive sustainable engagement:

[https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-walking/yes-counting-steps-might-make-you-healthier-idUSKCN1TQ2P0] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, obesity, technology, theory - 5 | id:253687 -

“Tracking your daily activity with a pedometer, wearable, or smartphone is an important part of any physical activity program,” Patel said by email. “However, it should be combined with other behavior change strategies such as goal-setting, coaching, or social interventions to increase sustainability.”

[https://ai-hr.cyber.harvard.edu/primp-viz.html] - - public:weinreich
ethics, technology - 2 | id:253683 -

visualisation of all available AI principles. No need for new ones, but a need to operationalise & contextualise them across AI life cycle, for all stakeholders involved - data scientist, business execs, procurement & regulators

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