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[https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/15/9129/htm] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, social_media, technology - 4 | id:1257483 -

Digital media are omnipresent in modern life, but the science on the impact of digital media on behavior is still in its infancy. There is an emerging evidence base of how to use digital media for behavior change. Strategies to change behavior implemented using digital technology have included a variety of platforms and program strategies, all of which are potentially more effective with increased frequency, intensity, interactivity, and feedback. It is critical to accelerate the pace of research on digital platforms, including social media, to understand and address its effects on human behavior. The purpose of the current paper is to provide an overview and describe methods in this emerging field, present use cases, describe a future agenda, and raise central questions to be addressed in future digital health research for behavior change. Digital media for behavior change employs three main methods: (1) digital media interventions, (2) formative research using digital media, and (3) digital media used to conduct evaluations. We examine use cases across several content areas including healthy weight management, tobacco control, and vaccination uptake, to describe and illustrate the methods and potential impact of this emerging field of study. In the discussion, we note that digital media interventions need to explore the full range of functionality of digital devices and their near-constant role in personal self-management and day-to-day living to maximize opportunities for behavior change. Future experimental research should rigorously examine the effects of variable levels of engagement with, and frequency and intensity of exposure to, multiple forms of digital media for behavior change.

[https://economics.mit.edu/files/22355] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, mental_health, mobile, technology - 5 | id:1022129 -

Emotions and worries can reduce individuals’ available attention and affect economic decisions. In a four-week experiment with 2,384 US adults, offering free access to a popular mindfulness meditation app (Headspace) that costs $13 per month improves mental health, productivity and decisionmaking. First, it causes a 0.44 standard deviation reduction in symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression, comparable to the impacts of expensive in-person therapy, with improvements even among participants with minimal or mild symptoms at baseline. Second, it increases earnings on a proofreading task by 1.9 percent. Third, it makes decision-making more stable across emotional states, reducing the interference of personal worries with risk choices. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential of affordable mindfulness meditation apps to improve mental health, productivity, and the impact of emotions on economic decisions.

[https://uxdesign.cc/designing-better-links-for-websites-and-emails-a-guideline-5b8638ce675a] - - public:weinreich
design, health_communication, how_to, mobile, online_marketing, technology - 6 | id:964506 -

Why are “click here” and “by this link” poor choices? And is it acceptable to use “read more”? In this article, I’ll explain popular wording and formatting mistakes and will show more accessible and informative alternatives.

[https://mental.jmir.org/2020/6/e16525/] - - public:weinreich
mental_health, mobile, technology - 3 | id:706825 -

Of the 293 apps shortlisted as offering a therapeutic treatment for anxiety and/or depression, 162 (55.3%) mentioned an evidence-based framework in their app store descriptions. Of the 293 apps, 88 (30.0%) claimed to use cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, 46 (15.7%) claimed to use mindfulness, 27 (9.2%) claimed to use positive psychology, 10 (3.4%) claimed to use dialectical behavior therapy, 5 (1.7%) claimed to use acceptance and commitment therapy, and 20 (6.8%) claimed to use other techniques. Of the 162 apps that claimed to use a theoretical framework, only 10 (6.2%) had published evidence for their efficacy.

[http://uxarchive.com/?ref=designtoolsweekly] - - public:weinreich
design, graphic_design, mobile - 3 | id:271281 -

UX Archive — collected the most interesting user flows that can help you analyze previous products and learn from others about what works and what doesn't. Examine tasks such as booking, logging in, onboarding, purchasing, searching, and more.

[https://customer.io/blog/triggered-engagement-email-campaigns/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, online_marketing, technology - 4 | id:266958 -

When the growth team took a step back, they realized it wasn’t enough to trigger just any notification. They needed to “show the right things to users at the right time — creating ‘aha moments’” where the user experienced the product’s core value. Rather than indiscriminately bombard the user with notifications, they concluded that they needed to be “really thoughtful about which messages to send which users” and focus “more of [their] resources on engaging users that were likely to churn.” Taking a page from Facebook, here are 5 kinds of engagement messages that work to activate, retain, and grow customers. Highly personal and targeted, these emails show off your product’s core value, ferry your users to their “aha moments”, and get people engaging with your product and brand again and again.

[https://pioneerreporter.com/depression-drugs-sales-upsurge-major-players-contributing-heavily-towards-market-growth-reports-fact-mr-study/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mental_health, mobile - 3 | id:266046 -

demand for depression drugs is also witnessing a decline as end-users have more coping options at their disposal. The huge popularity of mental health apps, such as Headspace, Calm, Moodnotes, Pacifica, and SuperBetter has given patients more control over how they manage depression.

[https://medium.com/googleplaydev/putting-back-users-to-the-forefront-sustainable-engagement-tips-from-behavioral-science-b9557af3da3e] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, mobile, technology - 4 | id:264227 -

Luckily, behavioral science can help close the intention-action gap, offering a toolkit to help change behavior for the better. Here are three ways we can apply lessons from behavioral science to drive sustainable engagement:

[https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-walking/yes-counting-steps-might-make-you-healthier-idUSKCN1TQ2P0] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, mobile, obesity, technology, theory - 5 | id:253687 -

“Tracking your daily activity with a pedometer, wearable, or smartphone is an important part of any physical activity program,” Patel said by email. “However, it should be combined with other behavior change strategies such as goal-setting, coaching, or social interventions to increase sustainability.”

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