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[https://behavioralscientist.org/busting-misbeliefs-to-improve-womens-well-being/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, HIV_AIDS, sample_campaigns, social_norms - 4 | id:266742 -

Two examples of campaigns tackling misbeliefs - one addressing misperceptions of the likelihood of an event (girls contracting HIV in South Africa) and one addressing misperceptions of social norms (women working outside the home in Saudi Arabia):

[https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2749761] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, gaming, obesity - 4 | id:266739 -

In this randomized clinical trial of 602 overweight and obese adults from 40 states across the United States, gamification interventions with support, collaboration, and competition significantly increased physical activity compared with the control group during the 24-week intervention. The competition arm had the greatest increase in physical activity from baseline during the intervention; during the 12-week follow-up, physical activity was lower in all arms, but remained significantly greater in the competition arm than in the control arm.

[https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/how-should-we-talk-about-whats-happening-to-our-planet/2019/08/26/d28c4bcc-b213-11e9-8f6c-7828e68cb15f_story.html?noredirect=on] - - public:weinreich
environment, health_communication, policy - 3 | id:266706 -

In the middle of a winter’s night in 2017, Frank Luntz’s cellphone alerted him to a nearby wildfire. The longtime analyst of public opinion opened his bedroom curtains and saw, less than a mile away, flames chewing the dark sky over Los Angeles. Luntz — who specializes in how the public reacts to words — saw scary evidence of a threat that he once tried to neutralize with language. In 2001, he’d written a memo of environmental talking points for Republican politicians and instructed them to scrub their vocabulary of “global warming,” because it had “catastrophic connotations,” and rely on another term: “climate change,” which suggested “a more controllable and less emotional challenge.” Last month, with a revised script, Luntz appeared before the Senate Democrats’ Special Committee on the Climate Crisis. “I’m here before you to say that I was wrong in 2001,” Luntz said. Nearby was a colorful chart of vocabulary, developed since his polling in 2009 showed bipartisan support for climate legislation. He went on: “I’ve changed. And I will help you with messaging, if you wish to have it.”

[https://www.preparecenter.org/toolkit/data-playbook-toolkit] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, quantitative, research, training - 5 | id:266662 -

The Data Playbook Beta is a recipe book or exercise book with examples, best practices, how to's, session plans, training materials, matrices, scenarios, and resources. The data playbook will provide resources for National Societies to develop their literacy around data, including responsible data use and data protection. The content aims to be visual, remixable, collaborative, useful, and informative. There are nine modules, 65 pieces of content, and a methodology for sharing curriculum across all the sectors and networks. Material has been compiled, piloted, and tested in collaboration with many contributors from across IFRC and National Societies. Each module has a recipe that puts our raw materials in suggested steps to reach a learning objective. To help support you in creating your own recipe, we also include a listing of 'ingredients' for a topic, organised by type:

[https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjhp.12369] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:266660 -

A habit is not necessarily a single action. Many behaviors that you may want to turn into habits have sub-actions involved in either instigating or executing the behavior. So there are a number of possible entry points to intervene to support the development of that habit.

[https://medium.com/busara-center-blog/addressing-gender-based-violence-norms-and-behaviors-aa1ce91c1f8c] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, entertainment_education, theory - 4 | id:266659 -

However, when the ZCCP video was combined with the social nudge : “Many people in your community have also watched this video,’’ the video shifted the perception of social norms towards less acceptance of GBV i.e. people were more likely to believe that their community found GBV unacceptable and more likely to think that their community thought GBV was a serious issue.

[https://keeptothepath.com/2019/05/23/crafting-environmental-messages-to-affect-social-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, health_communication - 3 | id:266626 -

Messages focused on the economic costs or negative impacts to individuals were more effective than motivational messaging in gaining support from the public and reducing the psychological distance of an environmental issue.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/we-should-listen-when-people-tell-us-find-chicken-box-claire-mcalpine/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, ethics, social_marketing - 3 | id:266564 -

There are 6 implications I've drawn from this initial analysis: Authentic engagement - embed authentic engagement and feedback processes all through the campaign development journey Behaviour change levers audit - identify and review all of the behaviour change levers, not just those where communications can make a difference Medium, message, messenger - critically analyse the relationship between these for each creative execution Authentic inclusion - ensure diversity is embedded into your teams and planning processes and that this inclusion is authentic and supportive The constraints of comms - recognise circumstances where communications are not the most effective behaviour change and/or confidence building lever Remember that communications don't take place in a vacuum - reflect on how communications can have an impact on the system outside of comms touchpoints

[https://www.asla.org/universaldesign.aspx] - - public:weinreich
design, environment, place, target_audience - 4 | id:266560 -

If we want everyone to participate in public life, we must design and build an inclusive public realm that is accessible to all. Public life can’t just be available to the abled, young, or healthy. Everyone navigates the built environment differently, with abilities changing across a person's lifespan. The sizeable global population of people with physical, auditory, or visual disabilities, autism or neurodevelopmental and/or intellectual disabilities, or neuro-cognitive disorders will face greater challenges if we don’t begin to more widely apply universal design principles.

[http://verificationhandbook.com/] - - public:weinreich
cgm, how_to, media - 3 | id:266535 -

A definitive guide to verifying digital content for emergency coverage Authored by leading journalists from the BBC, Storyful, ABC, Digital First Media and other verification experts, the Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid providers. It provides the tools, techniques and step-by-step guidelines for how to deal with user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/ulterior-motives/201908/there-are-two-types-misinformation] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:266533 -

the continued influence effect, which is the observation that the first pieces of information people hear continue to affect what people believe, even when they later find out that information is false.

[https://behavioralscientist.org/defaults-are-not-the-same-by-default/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, environment, theory - 4 | id:266531 -

To do so, we drew on a theoretical framework which highlights that defaults operate through three channels: first, defaults work because they reflect an implicit endorsement from the choice architect—your company’s HR department, your city’s policy office, your credit card company, your child’s school. Second, defaults work because staying with the defaulted choice is easier than switching away from it. Third, defaults work because they endow decision makers with an option, meaning they’re less likely to want to give it up, now that it’s theirs. As a result, we hypothesized that default designs that trigger more of these channels (also called the three Es: endorsement, ease, and endowment) would be more effective. In our analysis, we find partial support for this idea. That is, we find that studies that were designed to trigger endorsement (defaults that are seen as conveying what the choice architect thinks the decision maker should do) or endowment (defaults that are seen as reflecting the status quo) were more likely to be effective. In addition, we find that defaults in consumer domains tend to be more effective, and that defaults in pro-environmental domains (such as green energy defaults) tend to be less effective.

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