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[https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/lessons-from-the-front-line-of-corporate-nudging?_lrsc=f7c5c707-7557-4e49-adaf-9df3d902baf1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy - 3 | id:245234 -

To gain a better understanding of how to build a successful nudge unit, we recently talked to 14 experts who have led initiatives in sectors from financial services and healthcare to advertising and retail (see sidebar, “Fourteen experts forging the future”). Most stressed that while nudging is a catchy term, it does not do full justice to the broad applications of behavioral science to the businesses for which they and their units are responsible. Behavioral science, for instance, encompasses debiasing and other tools for driving behavioral change, including incentives, education, and awareness.

[https://www.npr.org/2019/01/11/684435633/how-science-spreads-smallpox-stomach-ulcers-and-the-vegetable-lamb-of-tartary] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:245233 -

Looking at their actions today, it can be hard to understand why these physicians would dismiss information that could have saved lives. But researchers who study the history of science say the spread of new innovations isn't always rational or linear. That's especially true when a new idea comes up against widely-held scientific beliefs. "We don't like to have beliefs that are different from the people around us," says philosopher of science Cailin O'Connor. "We don't like our actions to not conform with the people who we know and love." This week on Hidden Brain, we explore how information and misinformation spread in the world of science, and why evidence is often not enough to convince others of the truth.

[https://medium.com/@wyess/social-heuristics-the-pros-and-cons-of-gut-feelings-8019bfc3f50a] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:245232 -

Although heuristics may not always give the most accurate judgment in social situations, avoiding them is usually not an option. Social heuristics are innate in us, to help us make sense of complex social interactions. Nonetheless, it is crucial to bear in mind that an overreliance on heuristics can potentially result in judgment errors that manifest themselves as social stereotypes.

[https://www.bi.team/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Annual-update-report-BIT-2017-2018.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, policy - 3 | id:245231 -

This report is a summary of the work of the Behavioural Insights Team and its partners from September 2017 to November 2018. It includes highlights from our six offices around the world – in London, Manchester, New York, Singapore, Sydney and Wellington. We also cover our growing portfolio of BI Ventures, products that draw on behavioural insights to make positive social impact.

[http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/710771543609067500/pdf/132610-REVISED-00-COUNTRY-PROFILES-dig.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international, policy - 4 | id:245229 -

This report aims to capture both the spread and form of behavioral science in 10 countries, selected based on being innovators or early adopters in the field: Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Peru, Singapore, the U.S., and the UK. We hope that the experiences of these ten countries – including information on As of November 2018, there are at least 202 public entities all over the world applying behavioral insights to their policies (OECD, 2018) COUNTRY PROFILES - INTRODUCTION — 07 — how public bodies within these countries are integrating behavioral insights, how they are working to apply behavioral insights, and how these behavioral functions have been structured and staffed – can serve as useful information for all those working to leverage behavioral science to improve society. Given the expansion of behavioral science within governments; the shifting behavioral insights landscape; and the limit to, and wide distribution of, public information; this report presents a representative snapshot of the state of behavioral science within the governments of the profiled countries.

[https://www.leadershipcentre.org.uk/artofchangemaking/theory/cultural-web/] - - public:weinreich
organization, social_change - 2 | id:245227 -

The Cultural Web is a tool used to map the culture of an organisation and is a way of seeing and understating the different influences that affect organisational culture. It can be used to map existing culture and it can also used to map future culture based on the question: ‘What does the culture need to look like to make this change happen’? The two maps can then be compared in order to promote discussion and highlight what, where and how change can be implemented.

[https://toco.actknowledge.org/home.php] - - public:weinreich
how_to, social_change, theory - 3 | id:245225 -

Theory of Change Online (TOCO) is the only web-based software (no download required) that you can use to design and edit and store your Theory of Change, learn the concepts of theory of change, and capture your outcomes, indicators, rationales and assumptions in an interactive graphical environment.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/halo-led-guy-champniss-phd/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, theory - 3 | id:244191 -

Often, there's a disproportionate focus on pre-existing attitudes or other exogenous factors explaining why behavioural interventions may not work. In other words, attitudes or other factors got in the way of the intervention being effective. But that's not necessarily the case, as this study suggests. Instead, it might be the nature of the intervention itself which blocks the behaviour (change).

[https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2033192] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, storytelling, theory - 3 | id:244106 -

tories, and their ability to transport their audience, constitute a central part of human life and consumption experience. Integrating previous literature derived from fields as diverse as anthropology, marketing, psychology, communication, consumer, and literary studies, this article offers a review of two decades’ worth of research on narrative transportation, the phenomenon in which consumers mentally enter a world that a story evokes. Despite the relevance of narrative transportation for storytelling and narrative persuasion, extant contributions seem to lack systematization. The authors conceive the extended transportation-imagery model (ETIM), which provides not only a comprehensive model that includes the antecedents and consequences of narrative transportation but also a multidisciplinary framework in which cognitive psychology and consumer culture theory cross-fertilize this field of inquiry. The authors test the model using a quantitative meta-analysis of 132 effect sizes of narrative transportation from 76 published and unpublished articles and identify fruitful directions for further research.

[https://confluence.gallatin.nyu.edu/sections/creative-non-fiction/the-storytelling-animal] - - public:weinreich
storytelling, theory - 2 | id:244105 -

This principle of storytelling (more accurately, story-creating) does not only apply to bizarre YouTube videos featuring shapes. We are all perpetual storytellers in and of our own lives—in fact, we often see our lives as a “journey.” When we tell our friends anecdotes from the past, when we gossip or tell jokes, we are striving to find meaning and order in our lives through storytelling.

[https://www.ssoar.info/ssoar/bitstream/handle/document/46065/ssoar-rcr-2016-graaf_et_al-Characteristics_of_narrative_interventions_and.pdf?sequence=1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, health_communication, storytelling - 4 | id:244104 -

To provide an overview of the different characteristics of narratives in health effects research and of the persuasive effects that were found, we review 153 experimental studies on health-related narrative persuasion with a focus on the narrative stimuli. The results show that: a) with regard to the content, showing the healthy behavior in a narrative (as opposed to the unhealthy behavior with negative consequences) may be associated with effects on intention. Narratives that contain high emotional content are more often shown to have effects. b) With regard to the form, for print narratives, a first-person perspective is a promising characteristic in light of effectiveness. c) With regard to the context, an overtly persuasive presentation format does not seem to inhibit narrative persuasion. And d) other characteristics, like character similarity or the presentation medium of the narrative, do not seem to be promising characteristics for producing health effects. In addition, fruitful areas for further research can be found in the familiarity of the setting and the way a health message is embedded in the narrative. Because of the diversity of narrative characteristics and effects that were found, continued research effort is warranted on which characteristics lead to effects. The present review provides an overview of the evidence for persuasive narrative characteristics so far.

[https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1359105316656243] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, entertainment_education, evaluation, storytelling - 4 | id:244103 -

The objective of this review was to summarize the literature supporting narrative interventions that target health-promoting behaviours. Eligible articles were English-language peer-reviewed studies that quantitatively reported the results of a narrative intervention targeting health-promoting behaviours or theoretical determinants of behaviour. Five public health and psychology databases were searched. A total of 52 studies met inclusion criteria. In all, 14 studies found positive changes in health-promoting behaviours after exposure to a narrative intervention. The results for the changes in theoretical determinants were mixed. While narrative appears to be a promising intervention strategy, more research is needed to determine how and when to use these interventions.

[https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0754/713b05da5f05d699ac856a17c1ab3348290c.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, storytelling, theory - 4 | id:244102 -

Narrative is the basic mode of human interaction and a fundamental way of acquiring knowledge. In the rapidly growing field of health communication, narrative approaches are emerging as a promising set of tools for motivating and supporting health-behavior change. This article defines narrative communication and describes the rationale for using it in health-promotion programs, reviews theoretical explanations of narrative effects and research comparing narrative and nonnarrative approaches to persuasion, and makes recommendations for future research needs in narrative health communication.

[https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1186/s12889-019-6696-2.pdf] - - public:weinreich
quantitative, research, target_audience - 3 | id:244100 -

The aim of this study was to establish if distinct segments were evident in a sexual health context drawing from measures sourced from four segmentation bases extending application of segmentation to all recommended bases [46]. This study indicates how researchers can use two-step cluster analysis to identify segments, which are represented by a group of individuals who share similar characteristics that differ from other groups in the larger heterogeneous target audience. Further, this study demonstrates how available information can be used delivering a dashboard to inform program design and planning.

[https://www.johnhaydon.com/increase-fundraising-results-donor-hero/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, nonprofit, storytelling - 4 | id:244078 -

When you tell donors they can “feed hungry children”, “stop human trafficking” or “give twice the hope”, you make them the hero. This engages a “storytelling switch” that triggers a rush of cortisol and oxytocin throughout their body: Cortisol focuses your attention on a problem that needs solving (feeding hungry children). Oxytocin magnifies your feelings of empathy, caring, and love. Can brain chemistry really increase fundraising results? Short answer: Yes. Every. Single. Time. Stories are powerful because they transport us into other people’s worlds but, in doing that, they change the way our brains work and potentially change our brain chemistry. – Paul Zak In fact, the release of these two chemicals are actually predictors of giving behavior. Stories increase fundraising results! Researchers in one study concluded is that story structure (hook, problem, payoff) kicks off the chemistry associated with giving.

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