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[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/behavioural-and-social-sciences-to-enhance-the-efficacy-of-health-promotion-interventions-redesigning-the-role-of-professionals-and-people/01655ECBEE06104DF2D35C61E2A62BC3/core-read] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, sample_campaigns - 4 | id:283092 -

applying behavioral science to health promotion

[https://www.ucl.ac.uk/behaviour-change/abc-guides] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, government, how_to - 3 | id:283040 -

Commissioned by Public Health England's Behavioural Insights team (PHEBI), the CBC is excited to announce the completion of user-friendly guides to using the Behaviour Change Wheel, aimed at national and local government. The new guide provides a structured approach and can be used to help: develop behaviour change interventions, build on modify existing interventions, and choose from existing or planned interventions.

[https://measured.design/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, sample_campaigns, strategy - 4 | id:283028 -

MeasureD is a resource for anyone wanting to understand, measure, and scale the impact of social design in order to strengthen society and create the conditions for equitable human health. It is intended to represent the highest level of practice and help organizations and practitioners understand where, when, and how social design is most effective. includes case studies

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272494419308011] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, marketing, nutrition, social_marketing - 5 | id:281079 -

We tested how reframing the name of the vegetarian food category shapes food choices. • Environmental, social, and neutral (vs. vegetarian) frames boosted vegetarian choice. • No consistent differences emerged among the three non-vegetarian frames. • We investigated the underlying psychological mechanisms behind the main effects.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/nudge-forgood/06BC9E9032521954E8325798390A998A] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:279117 -

Insights from the behavioural sciences are increasingly used by governments and other organizations worldwide to ‘nudge’ people to make better decisions. Furthermore, a large philosophical literature has emerged on the ethical considerations on nudging human behaviour that has presented key challenges for the area, but is regularly omitted from discussion of policy design and administration. We present and discuss FORGOOD, an ethics framework that synthesizes the debate on the ethics of nudging in a memorable mnemonic. It suggests that nudgers should consider seven core ethical dimensions: Fairness, Openness, Respect, Goals, Opinions, Options and Delegation. The framework is designed to capture the key considerations in the philosophical debate about nudging human behaviour, while also being accessible for use in a range of public policy settings, as well as training.

[https://medium.com/airbel/lessons-learned-from-the-intersection-of-behavioral-and-human-centered-design-in-humanitarian-work-60853f8a3fd4] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international - 3 | id:279115 -

This example demonstrates how the IRC’s Airbel Impact Lab integrates behavioral science and human-centered design to develop scalable solutions to humanitarian problems. On their own, these approaches have been leveraged in a variety of contexts across the world — what is unique about the Airbel approach is bringing them together.

[https://hbr.org/2020/02/how-digital-design-drives-user-behavior] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design, online_marketing, technology - 5 | id:279086 -

A review of recent research provides clear evidence that many organizations are currently undervaluing the power of digital design and should invest more in behaviorally informed designs to help people make better choices. In many cases, even minor fixes can have a major impact, offering a return on investment that’s several times larger than the conventional use of financial incentives or marketing and education campaigns.

[https://hbr.org/2019/11/breaking-down-the-barriers-to-innovation] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, organization - 3 | id:277240 -

Fortunately, it’s possible to “hack” this problem. Drawing on the behavioral-change literature and on our experiences working with dozens of global companies, including DBS, Southeast Asia’s biggest bank, we’ve devised a practical way to break bad habits that squelch innovation and to develop new ones that inspire it. Like most hacks, our approach isn’t expensive, though it does take time and energy. It involves setting up interventions we call BEANs, shorthand for behavior enablers, artifacts, and nudges. Behavior enablers are tools or processes that make it easier for people to do something different. Artifacts—things you can see and touch—support the new behavior. And nudges, a tactic drawn from behavioral science, promote change through indirect suggestion and reinforcement. Though the acronym may sound a bit glib, we’ve found that it’s simple and memorable in a way that’s useful for organizations trying to develop better habits.

[https://www.thegoodmancenter.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/freerange_2020_01.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, storytelling - 3 | id:277022 -

And as to the central question of using both fear and hope: “I think we're in a moment where fear is a stronger motivator than hope,“ Parfrey began. “I'm looking at the evidence. I'm looking at Greta Thunberg. There is a tinge of the apocalypse in her framing.“ But Parfrey was quick to add that fear, by itself, isn't the only button to press. “The data is clear on this,“ he said. “The more dire the messages sound, the more individuals will tuneout. And I say this with full-knowledge that the climate picture is dire. You have to be honest, you have to present the sobering information, yet we still have the choice before us to dramatically improve the situation or make it worse. The choice is still ours.“

[https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fundraising/2018-19_Report] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, nonprofit, social_norms - 3 | id:273154 -

Addressing the Social Proof Question The online fundraising team often receives questions and comments about the use of negative social proof in our fundraising messages. Social proof is the phenomenon that people are prone to copy the actions of others; for example, if an individual is exposed to a group of people doing or buying something, they are more likely to do so themselves. One of the most recognizable phrases in our fundraising banners takes the opposite approach, stating: “... fewer than 1% of readers give.” and/or “... 99% of readers don’t give.” The online fundraising team has tested, dozens of times, removing this fact from our materials. Our donation rate drops when we try. This past year we engaged with some experts in the field and asked them to explore further why we consistently see this finding. Is there something about a non-profit or a donation context that alters the rules of social proof? We plan on continuing to conduct tests this coming year in hopes of finding conclusions around the fundraising and non-profit context of social proof.

[http://www.ghspjournal.org/content/7/3/404] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy - 2 | id:272197 -

To maximize the impact of Zika prevention programming efforts, a prioritization process for social and behavior change programming was developed based on a combination of research evidence and programmatic experience. Prioritized behaviors were: application of mosquito repellent, use of condoms, removing unintentional standing water, covering and scrubbing walls of water storage containers, seeking prenatal care, and seeking counseling on family planning if not planning to get pregnant.

[https://www.npr.org/2019/11/27/783495595/in-the-heat-of-the-moment-how-intense-emotions-transform-us?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hiddenbrain&utm_term=artsculture&utm_content=203102] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:272159 -

“I realized that when you're not in pain or cold or experiencing a powerful emotion like anger or fear, it's very difficult to imagine yourself in that situation,“ he says. This phenomenon can help us understand why we sometimes act in ways that mystify us, whether it's making an impulsive decision when we're hungry or freezing in a moment when we expected to be assertive. This week on Hidden Brain, we explore how certain situations cause us to become strangers to ourselves. We hear from people who can't reconcile the person they believe themselves to be with their actions while in the grip of an intense feeling. And we look at the deep psychological mystery that occurs during these moments: no matter how many times we discover the strangers living inside us, the next time always catches us by surprise.

[https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dNl41MLqArLjCoCXt19jh7vSSPooF9SP/view] - - public:weinreich
academia, behavior_change, research - 3 | id:272149 -

Workplace behavior change interventions, or workplace nudges, are strategies used to encourage people to act in their own self-interest. These interventions can be made possible with the help of digital technology, such as mobile applications or email, as well as choice architecture design in the physical environments of the workplace, such as posters, objects or furniture arrangement. To this end, we are going to focus on walking, napping, and eating. First, we will examine general workplace wellness programs - what other researchers have tried, how employees reacted to the programs, and their impact. Then, we will go into further detail about interventions related to our three focus areas.

[https://breakthroughactionandresearch.org/our-work/costing-and-economic-evaluation/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, how_to, management - 4 | id:272141 -

Currently Available Costing and Economic Evaluation Products The Business Case for Investing in Social and Behavior Change (report) new Guidelines for Costing Social and Behavior Change Interventions (report) new The Added Value of Costing Social and Behavior Change Interventions (brief) new Social and Behavior Change Business Case and Costing Webinar Generating Evidence to Inform Integrated Social and Behavior Change Programming in Nigeria Making the Business Case for Social and Behavior Change Programming (activity brief)

[https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2019/11/21/plastic-bag-environment-policy-067879?utm_source=Human+Risk&utm_campaign=0461ad06ff-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_7_12_2019_0_9_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a604cc998d-0461ad06ff-85786321] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, policy, price - 4 | id:272093 -

the small tax on bags was the actual driver for change, but people thought ecological factors, not the tax, had convinced them. The BeSci lessons here are first, that you can use tiny levers to effect significant change and secondly, that we don't always know, or want to admit, why we take certain decisions.

[https://digitalwellbeing.org/the-10-advertising-strategies-that-work-the-advertising-effect-speed-summary/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, design - 3 | id:272054 -

Basically, it’s Nudge for advertisers. Outlining ten evidence-based effective advertising strategies, each with a scientific underpinning, Adam Ferrier (psychologist and founder of Naked) is up there with fellow Antipodean Byron Sharp in terms of must-reads for marketers. Ferrier is a fan of ‘Action Advertising’ – influencing people by influencing actions rather than perceptions. Drawing on the evidence that advertising is notoriously poor at direct persuasion, Ferrier outlines 10 ways to influence actions instead. The underlying logic is that the easiest way to persuade someone is to allow them to persuade themselves – and this will happen quite naturally if you prompt (nudge, spur) people to act in a way consistent with a desired behaviour. Why? Because we tend to align our perceptions with our actions to avoid the mental discomfort of cognitive dissonance. In other words, if you influence action, you influence perception. Moreover, because perception-change is only a means to an end, the end being behaviour-change (buy, buy more, buy for more) – Action Advertising orientates advertising to what really matters, actioning behaviour change. For Ferrier, advertising is and must be about behaviour change; ultimately if no behaviour is changed as a result of advertising, advertising is valueless.

[https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l6542] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects - 2 | id:272046 -

Many participants were perfectly aware of alternative services. But the patients’ perception was that such services were overstretched or hard to access. In a structured survey of 25 departments, emergency staff shared similar perceptions. Perhaps what seems to be inappropriate or avoidable use is actually an active and semi-informed choice.

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