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[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/considered-approach-behavioural-innovation-part-01-johnson-frsa/?trackingId=tPMQQ58URsfNcNFkl2BYEw%3D%3D] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, social_marketing, strategy, theory - 4 | id:684362 -

The framework comprises 6 key stages. Each building on the insights of the previous and each with its own objectives, tools and resources: 1. What - are the target behaviours? 2. Who - should we focus our resource on? 3. Why - do/don’t those people manifest the target behaviours? 4. How - can we empower people to change? 5. So What? To what extent were our interventions effective? 6. What Now? How do we apply our learnings at scale?

[https://www.igi-global.com/chapter/rethinking-the-origin-of-the-behavioural-policy-cube-with-nudge-plus/269972] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy, strategy - 4 | id:684342 -

Key Terms in this Chapter Behavioural Policy Cube: The policy cube encapsulates three core features of the ‘libertarian paternalism’ framework; namely if an intervention or policy tool is informed by the standard axiomatic assumptions of rational man theory or by insights from behavioural theories, if it is internality or externality targeting, and if it is regulatory or libertarian in nature (Oliver, 2017b). Nudge: A nudge is any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people's behavior in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives (Thaler & Sunstein, 2009). Boost: A boost improves the competency of a decision-maker by enriching his or her repertoire of skills and decision tools and/or by restructuring the environment such that existing skills and tools can be more effectively applied (Grüne-Yanoff & Hertwig, 2016). Think: A think is a schooling strategy that involves large-scale deliberations to enable citizens to own the process of behavioural reforms. These often include citizen forums and large-scale behavioural therapies. Nudge Plus: Nudge plus refers to an intervention that has a reflective strategy embedded into the design of the nudge. It can be delivered either as a one-part device in which the classic nudge and the reflective plus are intrinsically combined, or as a two-part device whereby the classic nudge is extrinsically combined with a deliberative instrument that prompts individual reflection on the nudge. (Banerjee & John, 2020).

[https://surgoventures.org/newsroom-all/analysis-us-general-population-survey-on-covid-19-vaccine-uptake] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy, target_audience - 3 | id:684174 -

The five psychobehavioral segments of Americans Surgo identified from its survey are: 1. The “Enthusiasts” (40% of the U.S. population). Every person in this group said they would get the vaccine as soon as it is made available to them. There are no barriers to vaccination 1 for people in this group—in fact, the key challenge will be ensuring vaccine supply meets their demand before they lose enthusiasm, as we’re seeing now as people struggle to sign up. 2. The “Watchful” (20% of the U.S. population). For this segment, social norms are important: Before they get the shot themselves, people in this segment first need to see that others in their peer group or community are getting vaccinated and having safe, positive experiences. 3. The “Cost-Anxious” (14% of the U.S. population). For this segment, time and costs are the primary barriers to getting the vaccine. Every member of this group reports having delayed seeking care for their health in the past due to the expense. The irony: Only 28% of people in this group lack health insurance, indicating that their concerns about costs override having insurance to cover them. 4. The “System Distrusters” (9% of the U.S. population). This group primarily believes that people of their own race are not treated fairly by the health system. Members of this group are likely to belong to, but are not exclusively, communities of color. There are multiple, complicated barriers for this segment, but most of them are related to trust in and access to a health system that has an inequitable history. 5. The “Conspiracy Believers” (17% of the population). This segment has perceived barriers around COVID-19 vaccination that Surgo believes are simply too hard to shift in the short term. It includes people who don't believe in vaccines in general, but the primary barrier for people in this group is their very specific and deeply-held beliefs around COVID-19. Every person in this group believes in at least one conspiracy theory: ○ 84% believe that COVID-19 is exploited by government to control people ○ 65% believe COVID-19 was caused by a ring of people who secretly manipulate world events ○ 36% believe microchips are implanted with the COVID-19 vaccine The three most persuadable psychobehavioral segments Surgo recommends prioritizing are the “Watchful”, “Cost-Anxious” and “System Distrusters” for maximum benefit. Each segment has specific barriers to overcome:...

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Kxbg4zvfdc] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:683967 -

In this presentation Liz Barnes, Vice Chair of the CIM Charity and Social Marketing Group, will discuss which tactics we should be worried about, which techniques might be considered unethical and ways we can influence and persuade with integrity.

[https://tcscraft.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/jobblog-heuristic-analysis/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, graphic_design - 3 | id:683966 -

Here’s an informal list of 20 Heuristics from Weinshenck and Barker in 2000. Jakob Neilsen identified 10 principles for user interface design in 1990. Gerhardt-Powals identified 10 principles of cognitive engineering in 1996. The point is that there is substantial agreement and overlap – and most of it makes sense on the face of it.

[https://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13012-021-01089-0] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:574115 -

There were some significant differences between BCTs reported in implementation and de-implementation interventions suggesting that researchers may have implicit theories about different BCTs required for de-implementation and implementation. These findings do not imply that the BCTs identified as targeting implementation or de-implementation are effective, rather simply that they were more frequently used. These findings require replication for a wider range of clinical behaviours. The continued accumulation of additional knowledge and evidence into whether implementation and de-implementation is different will serve to better inform researchers and, subsequently, improve methods for intervention design.

[https://breakthroughactionandresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/guidelines-for-costing-sbc-interventions.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, management, price - 4 | id:574107 -

Costing is the process of data collection and analysis for estimating the cost of a health intervention. High-quality cost data on SBC are critical not only for developing budgets, planning, and assessing program proposals, but can also feed into advocacy, program prioritization, and agenda setting. To better serve these data needs, these guidelines aim to increase the quantity and quality of SBC costing information. By encouraging cost analysts to use a standardized approach based on widely accepted methodological principles, we expect the SBC Costing Guidelines to result in well-designed studies that measure cost at the outset, to allow assessment of cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost ratios1 for SBC programming. Such analyses could also potentially help advocates for SBC to better make the case for greater investment in SBC programming.2 These guidelines lay out a consistent set of methodological principles that reflect best practice and that can underpin any SBC costing effort.

[https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2017-56961-001] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:573942 -

Psychological reactance theory (PRT; Brehm, 1966) posits that when something threatens or eliminates people’s freedom of behavior, they experience psychological reactance, a motivational state that drives freedom restoration. Complementing recent, discipline-specific reviews (e.g., Quick, Shen, & Dillard, 2013; Steindl, Jonas, Sittenthaler, Traut-Mattausch, & Greenberg, 2015), the current analysis integrates PRT research across fields in which it has flourished: social psychology and clinical psychology, as well as communication research.

[https://sites.google.com/monash.edu/behaviourworks-scaleup-toolkit/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to - 3 | id:573779 -

BehaviourWorks Australia and the Victorian Government Behavioural Insights Unit have developed an evidence-informed toolkit to help behavioural insights researchers and practitioners to start with scale up in mind, including how to: Learn about scale up, its challenges, and useful frameworks. Identify which behaviour to target with an intervention. Assess the feasibility of different intervention ideas. Select a scalable behaviour change intervention. Design or adapt an intervention for testing and scale up. Test scale up assumptions about your intervention in a pilot or trial. This website provides videos and tutorials on how to use the toolkit, and extra resources to help achieve behavioural impact at scale. All content will be iterated upon; we welcome feedback and the opportunity to develop better tools.

[https://osf.io/f6a48/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, how_to - 3 | id:573777 -

Our project tracks behavioural science evidence and advice about COVID-19 vaccine uptake. The handbook is for journalists, doctors, nurses, policy makers, researchers, teachers, students, parents – in short, it’s for everyone who wants to know more: about the COVID-19 vaccines, how to talk to others about them, how to challenge misinformation about the vaccines. The handbook is self-contained but additionally provides access to a Wiki of more detailed information, found here: https://sks.to/c19vax.

[https://www.squarepeginsight.com/post/all-that-glitters-is-not-gold-8-ways-behaviour-change-can-fail] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation - 2 | id:488545 -

Before we dive in, here is a quick summary of the proposed taxonomy of behaviour change failures: No effect Backfiring Intervention is effective but it's offset by a negative side effect Intervention isn't effective but there's a positive side effect A proxy measure changes but not the ultimate target behaviour Successful treatment effect offset by later (bad) behaviour Environment doesn't support the desired behaviour change Intervention triggers counteracting forces

[https://www.independentsage.org/uk-government-messaging-and-its-association-with-public-understanding-and-adherence-to-covid-19-mitigations-five-principles-and-recommendations-for-a-covid-communication-reset/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication - 2 | id:485405 -

Five principles for an effective COVID-19 lexicon 1. Messaging never merely provides factual information – communication unavoidably conveys many assumptions (the subtext, indirect meanings, inferences, and implications). 2. Messaging should be lexically and grammatically precise and thus easy to enact and adhere to. 3. Messaging should be ‘irony-resistant’. 4. ‘Branding’ or sloganeering should not come at the expense of clarity and precision. 5. Messaging should be underpinned by evidence about what is effective.

[https://www.sauder.ubc.ca/news/school-news/fighting-climate-change-behavioural-insights?utm_campaign=2020-sauder-q3-pr&utm_medium=paid_social&utm_source=linkedin&utm_content=climatechange-behavioural] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, theory - 3 | id:438296 -

SHIFT is an acronym for five psychological factors that make consumers more inclined to engage in pro-environmental behaviours: social influence, habit formation, individual self, feelings and cognition, and tangibility.

[https://www.cell.com/trends/cognitive-sciences/fulltext/S1364-6613(20)30224-2] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, evaluation, theory - 4 | id:436909 -

The behavioural change enterprise disproportionately focuses on promoting successes at the expense of examining the failures of behavioural change interventions. We review the literature across different fields through a causal explanatory approach to identify structural relations that impede (or promote) the success of interventions. Based on this analysis we present a taxonomy of failures of behavioural change that catalogues different types of failures and backfiring effects. Our analyses and classification offer guidance for practitioners and researchers alike, and provide critical insights for establishing a more robust foundation for evidence-based policy. Behavioural change techniques are currently used by many global organisations and public institutions. The amassing evidence base is used to answer practical and scientific questions regarding what cognitive, affective, and environment factors lead to successful behavioural change in the laboratory and in the field. In this piece we show that there is also value to examining interventions that inadvertently fail in achieving their desired behavioural change (e.g., backfiring effects). We identify the underlying causal pathways that characterise different types of failure, and show how a taxonomy of causal interactions that result in failure exposes new insights that can advance theory and practice.

[https://www.bakadesuyo.com/2019/12/change-someones-mind/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, how_to, strategy - 4 | id:436881 -

Again: you don’t convince people. People convince themselves. Studies done as far back as the 1940’s by Kurt Lewin showed that lectures about why people should change their behavior were effective a measly 3% of the time. But when people self-generated reasons for the same activity, behavior change occurred 37% of the time. People reject ideas they are given and act on ideas they feel they came up with themselves.

[https://www.bitbarriertool.com/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, price, professional_resource, social_marketing - 4 | id:415570 -

Welcome to The Behavioural Insights Team’s Barrier Identification Tool. What is it: This tool will help you to identify and categorise the barriers to a behaviour that you’re trying to change. Step 1: The COM-B Model Overview - a behaviour change framework that can be used to identify barriers to behaviour. Step 2: Review a worked example of how this tool can be used to identify barriers to a behaviour. ​ Step 3: Use the tool to identify barriers to a behaviour you’re trying to change.

[https://greatist.com/live/weight-loss-tips-how-not-to-self-sabotage?utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=What+are+the+Limits+of+Building+Better+Habits?+[Best+Reads]&utm_campaign=Weekly+Digest+(Oct+3)#3] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, inspiration, obesity, price - 4 | id:415541 -

We fall off track because a part of us isn’t sure that the goal we’re working toward is going to make our lives better. This causes inner conflict, and when there’s inner conflict, we do the easiest thing of all: nothing. I’ve presented this simple worksheet to many clients, and I’ve found that it helps determine what’s really holding them back.

[https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2020/09/21/habit-limits/?utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=What+are+the+Limits+of+Building+Better+Habits?+[Best+Reads]&utm_campaign=Weekly+Digest+(Oct+3)] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy - 2 | id:415536 -

In particular, a focus on habits is useful when: The most effective approaches depend more on patiently persisting over long periods of time, rather than overcoming brief, but intense, obstacles. The behavior you want can eventually run in the background of your life, not requiring lots of deliberate thinking and effort. You’re looking to make long-term changes to your routine or lifestyle, rather than a temporary shift for particular circumstances. Understanding the limitations of habits is part of what makes them powerful. If you go in with the right expectations, you’ll be far more likely to make them stick.

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