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[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022103118302427] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:243962 -

Individuals viewed calendars showing today as the first day versus a control. • Goal motivation increased if today matched the first day on a calendar. • Individuals made more self-reported progress towards personal goals if calendar matched.

[http://behavioralscientist.org/nudge-turns-10-a-special-issue-on-behavioral-science-in-public-policy/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy - 3 | id:234044 -

Week 1 When Everything Looks Like a Nail: Building Better “Behavioral Economics” Teams By Jason Collins Nudges Alone Won’t Save Nemo: Conservation in the Great Barrier Reef By John Pickering From Ph.D. to Policy: Facilitating Connections Between Junior Scholars and Policymakers By Ashley Whillans and Heather Devine Shouldn’t We Make It Easy to Use Behavioral Science for Good? By Manasee Desai RCTs Are Not (Always) the Answer By Tania Ramos and João Matos Week 2 Why Governments Need to Nudge Themselves By Michael Hallsworth and Mark Egan Behavioral Development Economics By Syon Bhanot and Aishwarya Deshpande Why Governments Should Treat Cybersecurity the Way They Do Infectious Diseases By Karen Renaud and Stephen Flowerday Pour One Out for Nudge’s Forgotten Peers By Jesse Dashefsky Helping Parents Follow Through By Nadav Klein, Keri Lintz, Ariel Kalil, and Susan E. Mayer Week 3 A New Model for Integrating Behavioral Science and Design By Sarah Reid and Ruth Schmidt Applying Behavioral Science Upstream in the Policy Design Process By Kate Phillips Lessons in “Nudging” From the Developing World By Abigail Goodnow Dalton Choice Architecture 2.0: How People Interpret and Make Sense of Nudges By Job Krijnen What the Origins of the “1 in 5” Statistic Teaches Us About Sexual Assault Policy By Alexandra Rutherford BONUS Nudge Turns 10: A Q&A With Cass Sunstein By Elizabeth Weingarten Nudge Turns 10: A Q&A With Ricard Thaler By Evan Nesterak

[https://bi.dpc.nsw.gov.au/assets/dpc-nsw-gov-au/files/Behavioural-Insights-Unit/files/a737731733/How-to-reduce-effects-of-scarcity.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to, price, theory - 5 | id:234040 -

Government policies and services can be hard to navigate for people who are already under pressure. By understanding the effects of scarcity, we can make these easier to access for the people who need them. https://bi.dpc.nsw.gov.au/blog/2018/12/13/a-guide-to-reducing-the-effects-of-scarcity/

[https://www.thebehavioralscientist.com/blog/the-behavior-design-checklist] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to - 3 | id:234039 -

Whenever you're trying to change a behavior, you should ask yourself the following four questions: 1. Am I clearly prompting the target person to do the behavior I want? 2. Is the behavior really hard to do? 3. Is the target person motivated to do the behavior I want them to do? 4. Am I rewarding the target person for doing the behavior? That's it. That's your behavior-design checklist.

[http://www.bhub.org/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, professional_resource, research - 4 | id:234038 -

Innovative solutions based on how people act and make decisions in the real world are often buried in academic journals. The Behavioral Evidence Hub (B-Hub) brings them into the light of day. On the B-Hub you’ll find strategies proven to amplify the impact of programs, products, and services—and improve lives. Projects + checklists

[https://www.constructionnews.co.uk/best-practice/health-and-safety/nudge-in-the-right-direction-using-psychology-to-boost-safety/10035384.article] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:229064 -

Cowry developed three interventions to tackle these challenges and improve health and safety: painting the canteen a shade of pink proven to reduce stress hormones; introducing a gold card system whereby workers who demonstrated safe behaviours entered a weekly prize lottery; and having specialists walk around site asking scripted questions that prompt workers to think about safety.

[https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/behavioral-economics/compliance-challenges-public-sector-programs.html?id=us:2sm:3li:4di4756:5awa:6di:MMDDYY::author&pkid=1005588] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, government, policy - 4 | id:187323 -

But to be effective, nudges should be calibrated; “one size fits all” approaches tend to fall short of expectations. Instead, policymakers can tailor their nudges to align with these three dimensions: Spectrums of acceptability (and deviance). How strictly must targets adhere to the rule? While driving a couple of miles over the speed limit is unlikely to result in a traffic violation, attempting to bring a weapon onto an airplane requires zero-tolerance enforcement. Frequency of action. How often must the target group provide input? It may be easier to have targets make a single decision to contribute or obey, as opposed to encouraging them to repeatedly make the same decision over time. For example, people usually only need to choose to be an organ donor once, but drivers put their seat belt on every time they get into a car. Target group diversity. How heterogeneous is your target group? People may come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, have different interests, or may speak another language, all of which makes it challenging to apply a blanket rule with universal success. Moreover, targets can be geographically scattered or online, making it difficult for policymakers to surveil the target group. For example, all vehicle owners must register their cars, but not everyone should seek the same preventative medical treatments. And even those that do require similar treatments may have different motivations for doing so.

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/future-minded/201810/nudge-fudge-leaves-policy-makers-in-the-dark] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, evaluation, government, policy - 5 | id:187321 -

Our work published this week analyses all 111 cases studies of behavioral techniques used by governments compiled by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). Our analysis demonstrates that none of the techniques used have scientific proven effectiveness.

[https://behavioralscientist.org/last-mile-lawyer-economist-a-marketer-behavioral-scientist-go-into-a-bar/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, policy, theory - 4 | id:177179 -

The table below provides guidance for thinking through when specific policy tools are useful and when choice architecture or nudging can be used to complement or enhance a particular strategy.

[https://www.liveworkstudio.com/monthly-magazines/nudges-arent-the-holy-grail-of-behaviour-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:177127 -

Sometimes it’s necessary to override the subconscious, and switch customers to a conscious state of having to make a decision. Rational override interventions prompt moments of reflection and stimulate customers to be active, aware and engaged. Although friction is generally perceived as a barrier, some situations require a micro moment of friction, carefully built-in at the right moment.

[https://theconversation.com/government-behavioural-economics-nudge-unit-needs-a-shove-in-a-new-direction-80390] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:76110 -

In that study, gender and ethnicity information was removed from descriptions of potential job candidates. It was a study designed to interrupt unconscious biases against women and ethnic minorities. The results were surprising - blind recruitment made things worse for women and members of ethnic minorities. These results illustrate the limits of behavioural economics in action.

[https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-utl/17rpirsbehavioralinsights.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, how_to - 3 | id:76146 -

This Behavioral Insights Toolkit was created as a practical resource for use by IRS employees and researchers seeking to incorporate Behavioral Insights into their work. This Toolkit describes the field of Behavioral Insights, its potential benefits, and how Behavioral Insights can be practically applied to serve taxpayers and help the IRS achieve its mission. It highlights examples of opportunity areas where Behavioral Insights has been applied both internally at the IRS and across the globe.

[http://comminit.com/global/content/behavioural-insights-united-nations-achieving-agenda-2030] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, international - 3 | id:76178 -

As noted here, common principles underlie and unify many key features of human behaviour. A quick guide - "SIMPLER" - articulates a set of common "nudges" that can be used to improve programme outcomes and efficiency: Social influence - e.g., persuade by referencing peers Implementation prompts - e.g., establish steps to desired action Mandated deadlines - e.g., make deadlines prominent Personalisation - e.g., use name, not generic greeting Loss aversion - e.g., emphasise losses, not just gains Ease - e.g., reduce steps in a process Reminders - e.g., use phone calls, texts, postcards

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