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[https://digitalwellbeing.org/the-10-advertising-strategies-that-work-the-advertising-effect-speed-summary/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, design - 3 | id:272054 -

Basically, it’s Nudge for advertisers. Outlining ten evidence-based effective advertising strategies, each with a scientific underpinning, Adam Ferrier (psychologist and founder of Naked) is up there with fellow Antipodean Byron Sharp in terms of must-reads for marketers. Ferrier is a fan of ‘Action Advertising’ – influencing people by influencing actions rather than perceptions. Drawing on the evidence that advertising is notoriously poor at direct persuasion, Ferrier outlines 10 ways to influence actions instead. The underlying logic is that the easiest way to persuade someone is to allow them to persuade themselves – and this will happen quite naturally if you prompt (nudge, spur) people to act in a way consistent with a desired behaviour. Why? Because we tend to align our perceptions with our actions to avoid the mental discomfort of cognitive dissonance. In other words, if you influence action, you influence perception. Moreover, because perception-change is only a means to an end, the end being behaviour-change (buy, buy more, buy for more) – Action Advertising orientates advertising to what really matters, actioning behaviour change. For Ferrier, advertising is and must be about behaviour change; ultimately if no behaviour is changed as a result of advertising, advertising is valueless.

[https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l6542] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects - 2 | id:272046 -

Many participants were perfectly aware of alternative services. But the patients’ perception was that such services were overstretched or hard to access. In a structured survey of 25 departments, emergency staff shared similar perceptions. Perhaps what seems to be inappropriate or avoidable use is actually an active and semi-informed choice.

[https://peoplescience.maritz.com/Articles/2019/Get-A-Dog#.XdHpTC3kciA.linkedin] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment - 2 | id:272024 -

Instead of trying to trigger a behavior change by trying to create a habit among your users, create an environment where a one-time action might result in the same behavior change.

[https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/11/18/the-benefits-and-risks-of-public-awareness-campaigns-world-antibiotic-awareness-week-in-context/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, health_communication - 3 | id:272021 -

the report sits uncomfortably with evidence that information needs vary across contexts; a 2018 review of awareness raising interventions across different target populations found success varied markedly. [11] The same message that will draw attention from policy makers may not resonate with the public and care providers around the world.

[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272494415300487] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, place - 3 | id:271918 -

Life course changes disrupt old habits and may create a mood for more change. • An intervention to promote sustainable behaviours was tested among 800 households. • Behaviour change was more likely if participants recently had moved house. • The results were compared with non-movers and a no-intervention control group. • The ‘window of opportunity’ lasted up to three months after relocation.

[https://www.mdrc.org/publication/show-don-t-tell] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, training - 3 | id:271902 -

Sunstein and Thaler used the example of a high school cafeteria layout to demonstrate how small changes in our environment can influence our behavior, and we’ve discussed how a well-laid out office space can improve program participation rates. The example and our observations inspired MDRC’s Center for Behavioral Science (CABS) to create an interactive training session on the power of physical space to provide nudges. We asked training participants — staff at workforce development programs that help people find and keep employment — to try organizing their space with different goals in mind by designing a hypothetical high school cafeteria. Workshop participants received paper cut-out icons for all the essential materials — salads, hot food, snacks, desserts, beverages, cash registers, tables — and were asked to organize a logical cafeteria environment. But the directions had a catch. Each group received a unique goal: arrange the materials to maximize either: Healthy eating, Profits, or Efficiency.

[https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-019-0384-1.epdf?author_access_token=njVqmygd_g1KxYf4M0-RJ9RgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0MWluUZTk_2KWmnE5f8I6FGgR--ouuiEbShcohwnP_gPhSbx8yZouSMRv-IVTBRPLHgZUoAkSSJ7pXQ68Hb0uqRZGu3jAgq3gxVEx8zvKzBRA%3D%3D] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, campaign_effects, environment, social_marketing, social_norms - 5 | id:271299 -

You can either have rapid uptake OR large-scale adoption, but generally you don't find both together in these types of initiatives.

[https://behaviouraleconomics.pmc.gov.au/learn-hub/be-skilled] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, government, policy, professional_resource, training - 5 | id:269650 -

Want to learn more about applying behavioural insights to public policy? Take our free online course—Behavioural insights for public policy. There’s six learning modules, each with a quiz, to measure learning and understanding. It should help you understand the basics of BI, the mission and work of BETA, as well as the ethical application of the field. It takes about two hours – but you can save your progress and do it at your own pace.

[https://medium.com/personal-growth/the-problem-with-habits-and-why-most-of-them-fail-b48596e44df1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:269563 -

there is no clear consensus on how long it takes to form a habit is because this has nothing to do with the behavior pattern itself and everything to do with the underlying coherence of the values dictating that behavior.

[https://sites.google.com/view/behavioralpublic/home] - - public:weinreich
academia, behavior_change, design, policy - 4 | id:269540 -

This is the website for a PhD-level mini-course in behavioral public economics developed by Hunt Allcott and Dmitry Taubinsky. Through the lens of neoclassical economics, the role of government is to provide public goods, correct externalities, provide information, and address other market failures. In practice, however, some public policies are motivated by the concern that people do not act in their own best interest. For example, many countries ban drugs, tax cigarettes, alcohol, and sugary drinks, or subsidize retirement savings and energy-efficient appliances, all largely on the grounds that consumers would be better off consuming more or less than they do. Standard approaches to policy analysis rely on revealed preference assumptions to measure an agent’s welfare. Under these assumptions, the direct effect of any policy that changes choices is to reduce consumer welfare. However, empirical evidence from behavioral economics in a variety of domains suggests that people sometimes do make systematic mistakes. The field of behavioral public economics extends the theoretical and empirical tools of public economics to incorporate the possibility of consumer mistakes into questions about policy evaluation and design. This is a PhD-level mini-course in behavioral public economics. In this course, we’ll consider questions like the following: How can we do welfare analysis if choice does not necessarily identify utility? How do we empirically measure consumer biases? How do we set socially optimal policies in settings when consumers may not act in their own best interest? Nudges change behavior at low cost. Does that mean they are a good idea? What are the costs and benefits of tax complexity?

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/tech-happy-life/201910/how-do-you-win-argument] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, strategy - 3 | id:267094 -

Well, if we want to sway other people to our “correct“ vision of things, we are most likely to do that by having a strong relationship with them. Ironically, it is through carefully and compassionately listening to others that we are more likely to sway their views.

[https://www.nap.edu/catalog/24790/the-value-of-social-behavioral-and-economic-sciences-to-national-priorities] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, policy, theory - 3 | id:266973 -

Nearly every major challenge the United States faces—from alleviating unemployment to protecting itself from terrorism—requires understanding the causes and consequences of people’s behavior. Even societal challenges that at first glance appear to be issues only of medicine or engineering or computer science have social and behavioral components. Having a fundamental understanding of how people and societies behave, why they respond the way they do, what they find important, what they believe or value, and what and how they think about others is critical for the country’s well-being in today’s shrinking global world. The diverse disciplines of the social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences ―anthropology, archaeology, demography, economics, geography, linguistics, neuroscience, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics―all produce fundamental knowledge, methods, and tools that provide a greater understanding of people and how they live.

[https://bbiasblog.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/attractive-names-of-the-meals-for-healthier-diets-of-the-children/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, branding, health_communication, obesity, youth - 5 | id:266972 -

Discarding classical solutions such as information campaigns, it offers a much simpler alternative: make the healthy options more tempting. How? By changing their names. Several research teams in the US have tried this strategy in various school canteens and they found that making the names “seductive”, catchy or funny can induce children to eat healthier.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/when-behavior-change-interventions-trigger-unintended-dr-agnis-stibe/?trk=v-feed] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, ethics - 2 | id:266964 -

In this paper, we discussed multiple ways how behavior change interventions can backfire. We provided a framework to help facilitate the discussion of this topic, and created tools to aid academics in the study of this realm, and support practitioners to remain mindful of the potential risks.

[https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/motr/promising-behavioral-intervention-helps-cut-idling-car-engines.html] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, sample_campaigns, social_norms - 3 | id:266961 -

Directing drivers to “think of themselves” successfully led to far more drivers switching off their idling engines: More drivers switched off their engines in the private self-focused condition (51%) compared with the baseline condition (20%). “The odds ratios revealed that drivers were 1.83 times more likely to switch off their engines in the instructive watching eyes condition, and 4.82 times more likely in the private self-focus condition than in the baseline condition,” Meleady and colleagues write.

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