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[https://breakthroughactionandresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/guidelines-for-costing-sbc-interventions.pdf] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, management, price - 4 | id:574107 -

Costing is the process of data collection and analysis for estimating the cost of a health intervention. High-quality cost data on SBC are critical not only for developing budgets, planning, and assessing program proposals, but can also feed into advocacy, program prioritization, and agenda setting. To better serve these data needs, these guidelines aim to increase the quantity and quality of SBC costing information. By encouraging cost analysts to use a standardized approach based on widely accepted methodological principles, we expect the SBC Costing Guidelines to result in well-designed studies that measure cost at the outset, to allow assessment of cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost ratios1 for SBC programming. Such analyses could also potentially help advocates for SBC to better make the case for greater investment in SBC programming.2 These guidelines lay out a consistent set of methodological principles that reflect best practice and that can underpin any SBC costing effort.

[https://scienceforwork.com/blog/training-make-change-stick/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, training - 3 | id:309763 -

Key Points: Behaviour modelling training (BMT) is a popular training intervention which focuses on changing behaviours on the job. BMT improves trainees’ knowledge, skills, and desired actions on the job You can design BMT to work even better, for example by describing both the “what” and the “why” of the new behaviors trainees learn

[https://hbr.org/2019/11/breaking-down-the-barriers-to-innovation] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, organization - 3 | id:277240 -

Fortunately, it’s possible to “hack” this problem. Drawing on the behavioral-change literature and on our experiences working with dozens of global companies, including DBS, Southeast Asia’s biggest bank, we’ve devised a practical way to break bad habits that squelch innovation and to develop new ones that inspire it. Like most hacks, our approach isn’t expensive, though it does take time and energy. It involves setting up interventions we call BEANs, shorthand for behavior enablers, artifacts, and nudges. Behavior enablers are tools or processes that make it easier for people to do something different. Artifacts—things you can see and touch—support the new behavior. And nudges, a tactic drawn from behavioral science, promote change through indirect suggestion and reinforcement. Though the acronym may sound a bit glib, we’ve found that it’s simple and memorable in a way that’s useful for organizations trying to develop better habits.

[https://breakthroughactionandresearch.org/our-work/costing-and-economic-evaluation/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, evaluation, how_to, management - 4 | id:272141 -

Currently Available Costing and Economic Evaluation Products The Business Case for Investing in Social and Behavior Change (report) new Guidelines for Costing Social and Behavior Change Interventions (report) new The Added Value of Costing Social and Behavior Change Interventions (brief) new Social and Behavior Change Business Case and Costing Webinar Generating Evidence to Inform Integrated Social and Behavior Change Programming in Nigeria Making the Business Case for Social and Behavior Change Programming (activity brief)

[https://human-risk.com/the-first-rule-of-human-risk-is/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, management - 3 | id:265610 -

I’m often asked for my top tips for managing Human Risk. Over the next five weeks, I’m going to reveal the Five Rules of Human Risk, beginning, appropriately enough with the first: Rule 1: Human Risk can be managed but not eliminated On the face of it, this is a statement of the blindingly obvious. Yet it is fundamentally important; if we really want to manage Human Risk, then we need to accept that we can’t control every aspect of human decision-making. No matter how hard we try.

[http://www.arcusfoundation.org/publications/report-provides-insight-effecting-lasting-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, how_to, management, sample_campaigns, social_marketing - 5 | id:76388 -

This publication, designed as an open resource for grantees and the wider conservation and social justice movements, showcases the issues often faced by those in both sectors. It includes an overview of behavior change theories, a compilation of successful behavior change campaigns, lessons learned, and tools for planning new initiatives.

[https://behavioralpolicy.org/what-makes-interventions-last/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:76592 -

"This is the question that Todd Rogers and I explore in our paper, “Persistence: How Treatment Effects Persist After Interventions Stop”, published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. We propose a framework for understanding how and when interventions may lead to persistent behavior change. Specifically, we identify four “pathways”, or features of interventions, that may explain why some interventions are successful at generating persistent behavior changes. These pathways include (1) habit formation, (2) changing what or how people think, (3) changing future costs, and (4) external reinforcement"

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