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[http://www.liberatingstructures.com/9-what-so-what-now-what-w/] - - public:weinreich
consulting, creativity, management, training - 4 | id:271953 -

Together, Look Back on Progress to Date and Decide What Adjustments Are Needed (45 min.) What is made possible? You can help groups reflect on a shared experience in a way that builds understanding and spurs coordinated action while avoiding unproductive conflict. It is possible for every voice to be heard while simultaneously sifting for insights and shaping new direction. Progressing in stages makes this practical—from collecting facts about What Happened to making sense of these facts with So What and finally to what actions logically follow with Now What. The shared progression eliminates most of the misunderstandings that otherwise fuel disagreements about what to do. Voila!

[https://www.thinkcompany.com/2019/01/the-content-strategy-of-civil-discourse-part-five/] - - public:weinreich
creativity, management, social_media, strategy - 4 | id:267016 -

In part four, we looked at the difference between hierarchical and collaborative conversations. Now we bring it all together and ask, “What can we do?” The answer is, a lot. There are, as it turns out, many solutions to how we can do a better job of talking to each other, and any one of these are approaches you can try in your own lives or organizations.

[https://www.shopsplusproject.org/article/tool-helps-strengthen-capacity-and-sustainability-social-marketing-organizations] - - public:weinreich
management, organization, social_marketing - 3 | id:266047 -

SHOPS Plus developed the Social Marketing Organizational Development Assessment Tool that benchmarks progress in the institutional development of social marketing organizations. The tool assesses a social marketing organization across three areas of sustainability: technical, institutional, and financial.

[https://human-risk.com/the-first-rule-of-human-risk-is/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, management - 3 | id:265610 -

I’m often asked for my top tips for managing Human Risk. Over the next five weeks, I’m going to reveal the Five Rules of Human Risk, beginning, appropriately enough with the first: Rule 1: Human Risk can be managed but not eliminated On the face of it, this is a statement of the blindingly obvious. Yet it is fundamentally important; if we really want to manage Human Risk, then we need to accept that we can’t control every aspect of human decision-making. No matter how hard we try.

[http://www.chriscorrigan.com/parkinglot/facilitation-resources/] - - public:weinreich
conference, consulting, creativity, management, organization, professional_resource - 6 | id:264295 -

Here is a collection of resources I use in my facilitation practice. By and large these resources support facilitation of participatory and self-organizing process at scales ranging from very small groups to large conferences. I use some of these tools directly and others as inspirations to design and create my own processes. The first section provides links to participatory group process that are inclusive and self-organizing to varying degrees. The section on process architecture and maps contains links to sites whose worldviews can inform process design from single meetings to large scale change. The next three sections cover more specific tools useful for particular purposes, and finally the last section contains links to sources of ongoing inspiration.

[https://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/media-and-resources/publications/co-design] - - public:weinreich
conference, design, how_to, management - 4 | id:253682 -

Co-design with young people is the act of co-creating alongside stakeholders and young people to ensure that the results of the design meet the needs of those young people. Here are four key resources for background information to co-design. Download this visualisation (PDF, 4.3 MB) to learn where co-design sits on the spectrum of approaches to program design Use this template (PDF, 13 MB) as a reminder for the five principles of co-design This article contains historical and modern case studies of co-design in action The Outer East Children and Youth Area Partnership Co-design [OECYAP] has created a detailed resource of the theoretical and practical workshop content by co-design expert, Ingrid Burkett

[https://www.brandingstrategyinsider.com/2019/06/solving-brand-challenges-with-the-paradox-process.html#.XQJYdNMzaGg] - - public:weinreich
branding, management, research, strategy - 4 | id:253351 -

The Paradox Process is a model for brand development that when applied works for many brands facing complex challenges. Its primary purpose is to get insight into consumer pain points or contradictions that need solving, and it works by using contrary perspectives to arrive at new conclusions.

[https://www.politico.com/story/2019/06/06/epic-denmark-health-1510223] - - public:weinreich
design, management, technology - 3 | id:253348 -

an interesting case study, even outside of the IT issues, of what can happen when something designed for one culture is not adapted appropriately for another. From the very beginning, they should have had Danish doctors, nurses and designers involved in identifying the modifications that needed to be made. Just translating the words is not sufficient (and even that didn't seem to work very well).

[https://wip.pubpub.org/collectivewisdom] - - public:weinreich
management, media, social_change, storytelling, target_audience - 5 | id:253344 -

Why co-create and why now? Collective Wisdom is a first-of-its-kind field study of the media industry, that maps works that live outside the limits of singular authorship. While the concept of co-creation is entering the zeitgeist, it is an ancient and under-reported dynamic. Media co-creation has particular relevance in the face of today’s myriad of challenges, such as the climate crisis and threats to democracy. But it is not without risks and complications. In this study we look at how people co-create within communities; across disciplines; and increasingly, with living systems and artificial intelligence (AI). We also synthesize the risks, as well as the practical lessons from the field on how to co-create with an ethos grounded in principles of equity and justice. This qualitative study reframes how culture is produced, and is a first step in articulating contemporary co-creative practices and ethics. In doing so, it connects unusual dots.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/really-best-way-start-meeting-steve-martin/] - - public:weinreich
inspiration, management - 2 | id:251670 -

Whoever is in charge of hosting the meeting, or the most senior person in the room, should take responsibility for introducing everyone. Doing so neatly sidesteps both the aforesaid problems. Any awkwardness Claire in procurement feels about mentioning her experience and expertise in a relevant issue the meeting will address is deftly deflected. Second, the procurement department’s hi-flyer is now better placed to listen to the experience and expertise of others in the room, without worrying that her turn to speak is rapidly approaching.

[https://amp.usatoday.com/amp/2787560002?utm_source=Non-Obvious+Newsletter+-+Main+List&utm_campaign=e88c053fa2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_02_13_11_48&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f14a852876-e88c053fa2-56884485] - - public:weinreich
management, public_relations, social_media - 3 | id:241727 -

An industry rule of thumb, verified by USA TODAY through interviews with nearly a dozen influencers, marketing professionals and influencer platform founders, is a baseline rate of about 1 percent of follower counts per sponsored Instagram post, or $100 for every 10,000 followers. That means someone with 100,000 followers might start around $1,000 per sponsored post, while an influencer with 1 million followers could charge $10,000. And some experts called that conservative. Along with pricing structures based on follower counts, CPEs (cost per engagement) have emerged as another way to calculate marketing rates. Engagement is typically defined by interactions with content such as likes, comments, clicks or shares. Engagement rates can be found by adding up all engagements on a post, dividing it by follower counts and multiplying by 100.

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