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[https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/opinion/earning-prizes-for-fighting-an-addiction.html?utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Neurosexism%3A+the+myth+that+men+and+women+have+different+brains+%5BBest+Reads%5D&utm_campaign=Weekly+Digest+%2] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy, substance_abuse - 3 | id:243960 -

David Oliver wins gift cards for staying away from drugs. At St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia — which treats more overdoses than any other hospital in Canada — a program rewards users of cocaine and other stimulants with prizes when they don’t use. It’s a new approach to help substance abusers, and it’s also being tried in Veterans Affairs hospitals across the United States.

[https://www.alterspark.com/blog/claim-1-takes-21-days-form-habit] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, strategy, theory - 3 | id:186802 -

From my own experience, there appears to be a scientific trend (that I have not systematically evaluated) that successful behavior change programs tend to run for approximately 2-months, and that after this point, there is a large drop in adherence and impact. The big statistical meta-analysis that I carried out a few years back (http://www.jmir.org/2011/1/e17/), showed that online programs lasting more than 4 months, all failed. So as a rule of thumb, for most general purposes, 8-weeks is not a bad approximate time duration for many programs.

[https://behavioralpolicy.org/what-makes-interventions-last/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:76592 -

"This is the question that Todd Rogers and I explore in our paper, “Persistence: How Treatment Effects Persist After Interventions Stop”, published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. We propose a framework for understanding how and when interventions may lead to persistent behavior change. Specifically, we identify four “pathways”, or features of interventions, that may explain why some interventions are successful at generating persistent behavior changes. These pathways include (1) habit formation, (2) changing what or how people think, (3) changing future costs, and (4) external reinforcement"

[http://www.activationpoint.org/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, social_change, strategy - 3 | id:79400 -

A downloadable publication for people in social change organizations that focuses on strategies for mobilizing concerned people to supportive action by identifying and leveraging their activation points. (via Guy Kawasaki)

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