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[https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/how-should-we-talk-about-whats-happening-to-our-planet/2019/08/26/d28c4bcc-b213-11e9-8f6c-7828e68cb15f_story.html?noredirect=on] - - public:weinreich
environment, health_communication, policy - 3 | id:266706 -

In the middle of a winter’s night in 2017, Frank Luntz’s cellphone alerted him to a nearby wildfire. The longtime analyst of public opinion opened his bedroom curtains and saw, less than a mile away, flames chewing the dark sky over Los Angeles. Luntz — who specializes in how the public reacts to words — saw scary evidence of a threat that he once tried to neutralize with language. In 2001, he’d written a memo of environmental talking points for Republican politicians and instructed them to scrub their vocabulary of “global warming,” because it had “catastrophic connotations,” and rely on another term: “climate change,” which suggested “a more controllable and less emotional challenge.” Last month, with a revised script, Luntz appeared before the Senate Democrats’ Special Committee on the Climate Crisis. “I’m here before you to say that I was wrong in 2001,” Luntz said. Nearby was a colorful chart of vocabulary, developed since his polling in 2009 showed bipartisan support for climate legislation. He went on: “I’ve changed. And I will help you with messaging, if you wish to have it.”

[https://www.preparecenter.org/toolkit/data-playbook-toolkit] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, how_to, quantitative, research, training - 5 | id:266662 -

The Data Playbook Beta is a recipe book or exercise book with examples, best practices, how to's, session plans, training materials, matrices, scenarios, and resources. The data playbook will provide resources for National Societies to develop their literacy around data, including responsible data use and data protection. The content aims to be visual, remixable, collaborative, useful, and informative. There are nine modules, 65 pieces of content, and a methodology for sharing curriculum across all the sectors and networks. Material has been compiled, piloted, and tested in collaboration with many contributors from across IFRC and National Societies. Each module has a recipe that puts our raw materials in suggested steps to reach a learning objective. To help support you in creating your own recipe, we also include a listing of 'ingredients' for a topic, organised by type:

[https://keeptothepath.com/2019/05/23/crafting-environmental-messages-to-affect-social-change/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, health_communication - 3 | id:266626 -

Messages focused on the economic costs or negative impacts to individuals were more effective than motivational messaging in gaining support from the public and reducing the psychological distance of an environmental issue.

[https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/ulterior-motives/201908/there-are-two-types-misinformation] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:266533 -

the continued influence effect, which is the observation that the first pieces of information people hear continue to affect what people believe, even when they later find out that information is false.

[https://ssir.org/articles/entry/six_ways_to_boost_public_support_for_prevention_based_policy] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, policy, social_change, strategy - 4 | id:266042 -

Addressing massive challenges like climate change and poverty requires that we take a long-term view and have a preventative mindset. Since these perspectives challenge the deeply ingrained ways we have evolved to think and behave, we need to pay attention to why prevention is hard to think about and navigate the cognitive road blocks that stand in the way of progress. By presenting issues and information in ways that unlock support for preventative approaches, we can galvanize the ideas and actions social and environmental change requires.

[https://www.statnews.com/2019/08/05/the-vaccine-whisperers-counselors-gently-engage-new-parents-before-their-doubts-harden-into-certainty/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, sample_campaigns - 2 | id:266003 -

The counselors are themselves a kind of prophylaxis. Their job is to ask about parents’ worries long before anyone’s trying to vaccinate their kids at 2 months of age, to answer whatever questions come up — in other words, to inoculate against the misconceptions that might infect them online.

[https://behaviouraleconomics.pmc.gov.au/form-a-palooza-2019] - - public:weinreich
design, government, graphic_design, health_communication, how_to - 5 | id:265985 -

BETA hosted Australia’s first ever Form-a-Palooza on 28 June 2019. It was a one-day festival of forms, designed to share the latest in form design with public servants from across the Australian Government. Forms are the most common interaction between people and the government, and there are thousands of them—most still in paper. Improving forms is a simple but important way to improve service delivery and increase public satisfaction with government. Over 200 participants from 38 agencies came along to Form-a-Palooza to learn new techniques and put them into practice. We also launched a brand new framework to guide the development of good forms—the WISER framework. It’s based on the latest research, as well as our own experience working with government agencies on forms, letters and communication.

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5789790/?fbclid=IwAR1HekVX1NeS8njx68dt0sYqca4GWRsK3fLeMkgRfrT-j17Q4Jjyuab0uYk] - - public:weinreich
campaign_effects, health_communication, theory - 3 | id:264291 -

Fear appeals are effective. The present meta-analysis found that fear appeals were successful at influencing attitudes, intentions, and behaviors across nearly all conditions that were analyzed. Even when a moderator was unrelated to fear appeal effectiveness, fear appeals were still more effective than comparison treatments. Further, there was not one level of any moderator that we tested for which fear appeals backfired to produce worse outcomes relative to the comparison groups.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RwJbhkCA58&feature=youtu.be] - - public:weinreich
academia, conference, health_communication, professional_resource, research - 5 | id:264284 -

Every field in science uses the same, old, wall-of-text poster design. If we can improve the knowledge transfer efficiency of that design even by a little bit, it could have massive ripple effects on all of science. Also, poster sessions tend to suck, so here's my pitch to make them more efficient AND more fun with a new approach to designing scientific posters/academic posters that is both more usable, and easier to create!

[http://www.lse.ac.uk/iga/assets/documents/arena/archives/Italy-migration-report.pdf] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, media, social_media - 3 | id:264251 -

In 2018, LSE Arena, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera analysed the engagement of Corriere readers with content touching on the controversial and polarising topic of migration in Italy. The purpose was to address one of the most difficult problems in journalism today, which can be summed up in four related questions: • Which types of journalism intensify polarisation, and which reduce it? • How can one best communicate facts? • How can we foster constructive engagement? • Are there ways to avoid playing into the media strategies of “anti-establishment” politicians who make purposefully controversial statements in order to dominate the national debate, and then attack media who criticise them as “enemies of the people” or purveyors of “fake news”?

[https://redirectmethod.org/blueprint/] - - public:weinreich
advertising, behavior_change, health_communication, how_to, online_marketing, video - 6 | id:264222 -

The Redirect Method uses Adwords targeting tools and curated YouTube videos uploaded by people all around the world to confront online radicalization. It focuses on the slice of ISIS’ audience that is most susceptible to its messaging, and redirects them towards curated YouTube videos debunking ISIS recruiting themes. This open methodology was developed from interviews with ISIS defectors, respects users’ privacy and can be deployed to tackle other types of violent recruiting discourses online.

[https://thebehavioursagency.com/richard-shotton-behavioural-science-marketing/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication, marketing, social_norms - 5 | id:255764 -

Consider three levels: literal, liberal & lateral. Example: social proof... Literal: share the percentage of people who follow the norm in general Liberal: tailor the claims to what “people like them“ do Lateral: suggest popularity rather than stating it

[https://journal-bpa.org/index.php/jbpa/article/view/55] - - public:weinreich
evaluation, health_communication, social_norms - 3 | id:253695 -

The results suggest that there was no significant difference in compliance rates between treatment and control schools six months post-treatment. To our knowledge, it is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of descriptive social norms in increasing immunization compliance rates in a school-based setting. In addition, it serves as an example of embedding a behaviorally-informed experiment in a government program utilizing high-quality administrative data.

[https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/better-say-easier-less-difficult-bri-williams/] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:251562 -

For customers or stakeholders who are prevention-minded, loss is boss. Speaking about the avoidance of negative consequences is powerful so use words and phrases like “gaps”, “missing out”, “waste”, and “avoid”. For customers or staff with a promotion-mindset, frame the gain. “Opportunity”, “growth”, “win” and “save” will be your go-to words.

[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322150387_A_Rose_by_Any_Other_Name_A_Subtle_Linguistic_Cue_Impacts_Anger_and_Corresponding_Policy_Support_in_Intractable_Conflict] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, policy - 3 | id:245239 -

Given the central role of anger in shaping adversarial policy preferences in the context of intergroup conflict, its reduction may promote conflict resolution. In the current work, we drew on psycholinguistic research on the role of language in generating emotions to explore a novel, extremely subtle means of intervention. Specifically, we hypothesized that phrasing conflict-relevant policies in noun form (vs. verb form) would reduce anger and impact policy support correspondingly. Results across three experimental studies in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict supported these expectations for both support for concessions (Studies 1–3) and retaliatory policies (Study 3), with reduction in anger mediating the salutary impact of noun form (vs. verb form) on policy support. These results expand our understanding of the influence of language on emotions and policies in the context of conflict and have applied relevance for conflict-resolution efforts. (1) (PDF) A Rose by Any Other Name? A Subtle Linguistic Cue Impacts Anger and Corresponding Policy Support in Intractable Conflict. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322150387_A_Rose_by_Any_Other_Name_A_Subtle_Linguistic_Cue_Impacts_Anger_and_Corresponding_Policy_Support_in_Intractable_Conflict [accessed May 02 2019].

[https://www.npr.org/2019/01/11/684435633/how-science-spreads-smallpox-stomach-ulcers-and-the-vegetable-lamb-of-tartary] - - public:weinreich
health_communication - 1 | id:245233 -

Looking at their actions today, it can be hard to understand why these physicians would dismiss information that could have saved lives. But researchers who study the history of science say the spread of new innovations isn't always rational or linear. That's especially true when a new idea comes up against widely-held scientific beliefs. "We don't like to have beliefs that are different from the people around us," says philosopher of science Cailin O'Connor. "We don't like our actions to not conform with the people who we know and love." This week on Hidden Brain, we explore how information and misinformation spread in the world of science, and why evidence is often not enough to convince others of the truth.

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