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[https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17302397#!] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, theory - 3 | id:234050 -

This article reports on new research that finds certain messages reduce fear of sharks, key to promoting conservation-minded responses to shark bites. Here it is argued that the sophistication in public feelings toward these highly emotional events has allowed new actors to mobilize and given rise to the ‘Save the Sharks’ movement. In a unique experiment coupling randomly assigned intent-based priming messages with exposure to sharks in a ‘shark tunnel’, a potential path to reduce public fear of sharks and alter policy preferences is investigated. Priming for the absence of intent yielded significant fear extinction effects, providing a viable means of increasing support for non-lethal policy options following shark bite incidents. High levels of pride and low levels of blame for bite incidents are also found. In all, this article provides a step towards improving our understanding of fear and fear reduction in public policy.

[https://keeptothepath.com/2018/07/19/understanding-how-messaging-is-perceived-by-the-public-through-a-new-theoretical-model/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, environment, health_communication, theory - 4 | id:186788 -

The results lead to some useful messaging recommendations, such as active publics being more effectively moved to action through motivational frames, rather than diagnostic (i.e. problem-focused) or prognostic (i.e. solution-focused) frames.

[https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/04/03/persuasive-messages-couched-in-emotion-may-backfire/134343.html] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, theory - 3 | id:79664 -

New research finds that people tend toward appeals that aren't simply more positive or negative but are infused with emotionality, even when they're trying to sway an audience that may not be receptive to such language. The findings appear in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science

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