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[https://www.guychampniss.com/blog/the-difference-between-doing-something-and-being-the-type-of-person-who-does-that-something] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, health_communication, target_audience - 3 | id:243848 -

When it comes to motivating people to vote, identity theory is influential. Studies have shown us that how we refer to people ahead of a vote can influence their likelihood to vote. In short, if we use a noun (a ‘voter’) rather than a verb (‘to vote’), we can see double digit increases in voter turn-out. To be clear, this is one of the largest effects identified in a large-scale field experiment — an uptick of over 10%, simply as a result of reframing the request to use the vote. Identity theory tells us this happens because the noun version (‘a voter’) speaks to our self-concept; wanting to align with what society expects of us, increases the likelihood of us engaging in that behaviour. It’s an opportunity for positive distinctiveness.

[https://www.edelman.com/trust-barometer] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, strategy, target_audience - 3 | id:234051 -

The 2019 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that trust has changed profoundly in the past year—people have shifted their trust to the relationships within their control, most notably their employers. Globally, 75 percent of people trust “my employer” to do what is right, significantly more than NGOs (57 percent), business (56 percent) and media (47 percent).

[https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/drink/mountain-dew-just-made-an-epic-advertising-fail-in-scotland/news-story/a3a3576efdc0a0ca56c2bc5d07a0872f#.jhrhv] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, online_marketing, research, target_audience - 4 | id:186610 -

Unfortunately for Mountain Dew The Scotsman didn’t include the fact that “chug” means “masturbation” in this particular part of the UK. And now, as Vice reports, the soft drink brand is being mercilessly ripped on Twitter for inadvertently telling everyone that they’re chronic masturbators. On Monday the company tweeted a .gif of a guy madly downing a bottle of Mountain Dew, with the slogan “epic thrills start with a chug”.

[https://www.axios.com/technical-experts-peers-considered-most-credible-on-social-media-1529288419-5a791be6-9ece-4d7b-9146-196e523c1bd4.html?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=lisocialshare&utm_campaign=organic] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, social_media, target_audience - 3 | id:167049 -

Technical experts and their peers are considered the most credible for information on social media, according to the latest 2018 Edelman Trust Barometer survey. By comparison, celebrities, corporate executives and journalists are considered far less credible.

[http://www.comminit.com/health/content/making-content-meaningful-guide-adapting-existing-global-health-content-different-audien?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DBClickHEALTHMarch2017&utm_content=making-content-meaningful-guide-adapting-existing-global-healt] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, international, target_audience - 3 | id:76206 -

https://www.k4health.org/resources/making-content-meaningful-guide-adapting-existing-global-health-content-different

[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/866456_3] - - public:weinreich
health_communication, target_audience - 2 | id:76327 -

One author has developed a practical approach to categorizing vaccine-hesitant parents into five groups, depending on the source and strength of their vaccine beliefs[9]: "Uninformed but educable" parents have been influenced by friends and relatives who have planted doubts about the safety of vaccines. They are unsure whether these messages are accurate and seek correct information and reassurance. "Misinformed but correctable" parents have heard only antivaccine messages, predominantly from media sources. They are open to provaccine messages and accurate information. "Well-read and open-minded" parents have researched pro- and antivaccine messages. They seek advice from a healthcare provider to assess the merits of the arguments and put them in a proper context. "Convinced and contented" parents have strong antivaccine views and go to the provider, sometimes owing to pressure from a family member, to listen to the other side of the argument. Although this group may change their attitudes over time, the chances of complete success are low. "Committed and missionary" parents hold firmly entrenched antivaccine views and may try and convince the provider to agree with them.

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