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[https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/magazine/magazine_article/public-healthonomics/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, price - 2 | id:76403 -

For public health, the key question is: When it is beneficial to charge a price for an intervention and when it is not? Research has shown that the best price for many prevention efforts is free, explains Cohen. It may not make economic or public health sense, but we human beings are much less likely to take steps to prevent illness than to treat it. We procrastinate. We forget. “If, on top of that, it costs something, then demand for preventive products like bed nets is too low,” she says. The behavioral economics of treatment is a different story. People recognize that they need it and are much more willing to pay. But there’s a sweet spot between charging too much, so people can’t afford the treatment, and charging too little, which can lead to indiscriminate and inappropriate use of a treatment.

[http://www.smartcompany.com.au/marketing/70552-behavioural-economics-has-a-sticky-date-problem/?platform=hootsuite] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, theory - 3 | id:76416 -

Rather than pulling behavioural insights together into a tasty, cohesive recipe, behavioural economics has offered myriad tasty morsels and left it up to the audience to reconcile them. People want choice. People get overwhelmed by choice. People follow what others do. People don’t like to be seen to follow others. People act impulsively. People stick with the status quo. People are lazy. People like challenge. Agghhhh! To be useful behavioural economics needs to evolve from a series of interesting anecdotes to a framework that can help analyse and resolve behavioural challenges. The Williams Behaviour Change Model So that’s what I’ve cooked up. I’ve created your very own behavioural framework that is as tasty as a non-deconstructed sticky date pudding. This model gets beyond behavioural economics for its own sake and provides a structured way for you to interrogate your behavioural challenge and design how to get people to take the action you want.

[http://acceleratorbehaviors.org/index] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, international - 2 | id:76462 -

The global community is committed to preventing the deaths of millions of mothers and children by 2020. USAID identified 10 Accelerator Behaviors that would get us there faster if practiced widely in 24 priority countries. Use this site to find out how to integrate Accelerator Behaviors into your health programming.

[http://voice.icecreates.com/voice/alcohol/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, substance_abuse - 3 | id:76463 -

A key finding of this study was that the young women used a series of visual cues to self-identify if they had drunk too much. “You start losing, like, your eyesight and stuff. Stuff goes blurry.” ICE has designed a series of behavioural nudges (e.g. blurred images in toilet mirrors) that will be employed in situ at pubs and clubs to use young women’s unconscious thoughts and nudge them to self-identify that they may be approaching their limit, thus enabling them to apply drink protective behavioural strategies more proactively.

[https://www.marketingsociety.com/the-library/why-we-left-behavioural-science-view] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, policy, theory - 3 | id:76502 -

But you have to get System 1 onside in the first place. Decisions have three big levers – in branding, in politics, in anything else. We call them Fame, Feeling & Fluency. Does a choice come to mind easily (Fame)? Then it’s a good choice. Does a choice feel good? (Feeling) Then it’s a good choice. Is a choice easy to recognise and understand? (Fluency) Then it’s a good choice.

[http://washdev.iwaponline.com/content/6/2/287] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, theory - 2 | id:76507 -

WASH/sanitation programs that focus on higher-level motivations on Maslow's model (e.g., self-esteem, love and belonging, and safety) are much more successful than those that focus only on physiological motivations (e.g., health) - a reminder to dig deeper to connect core values to the desired behavior.

[https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jun/01/nudge-economics-freakonomics-daniel-kahneman-debunked] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, theory - 3 | id:76548 -

Though nudge-economics remains seductive, what once seemed like a panacea has come to look a bit more like a series of sticking plasters. Earlier this year the nudge unit was removed from direct government control, partly sold to the Nesta innovation charity run by New Labour guru Geoff Mulgan, a move which seemed to suggest the prime minister no longer viewed it as quite so central to his philosophy. That move has coincided with a backlash, or at least a critical analysis, of some of the tenets on which its brand of behavioural economics is based.

[http://www.thinkadvisor.com/2016/02/01/why-clients-dont-take-your-advice?page_all=1] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:76585 -

Behavioral scientists have been studying these quirks of the mind for decades and have identified three main barriers that can lead clients astray. To summarize, clients need to: Believe what you’re saying Choose what to do Actually do it Each of these steps presents unique challenges.

[http://www.millwardbrown.com/Insights/Point-of-View/Make_Your_Brand_the_Obvious_Choice/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, branding, marketing - 3 | id:76589 -

There is an assumption that all decision making is instinctive, but in fact it's a balance between instinctive and deliberative. Marketers must try to understand what makes their brand the obvious choice for both types of decision making.

[http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17437199.2015.1138093] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design - 2 | id:76590 -

Note free appendix in Supplemental section provides examples of how this works. "A key insight is that these behaviours are not predominantly driven by deliberative conscious decisions, but occur directly in response to environmental cues and without necessary representation of their consequences. Consequently, interventions that target non-conscious rather than conscious processes to change health behaviour may have significant potential... We propose a framework for describing or categorising interventions to change health behaviour by the degree to which their effects may be considered non-conscious. "

[https://behavioralpolicy.org/what-makes-interventions-last/] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, management, strategy - 3 | id:76592 -

"This is the question that Todd Rogers and I explore in our paper, “Persistence: How Treatment Effects Persist After Interventions Stop”, published in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. We propose a framework for understanding how and when interventions may lead to persistent behavior change. Specifically, we identify four “pathways”, or features of interventions, that may explain why some interventions are successful at generating persistent behavior changes. These pathways include (1) habit formation, (2) changing what or how people think, (3) changing future costs, and (4) external reinforcement"

[http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/01/26/reducing-preventable-harm-in-hospitals/?smid=tw-share] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, health_communication - 3 | id:76594 -

"So the big question is: How can health systems be made safer when success means changing the attitudes and habits of health care professionals at a time when many are overwhelmed and deeply frustrated by all of the demands being made on them? What does it take to get them to embrace, with urgency, new ways of working?"

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