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[https://peoplescience.maritz.com/Articles/2020/Its-My-Life] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:744524 -

The following is from Dr. Bucher’s forthcoming book, Engaged: Designing for Behavior Change. I chose this section because it touches upon a PeopleScience theme: being successful and effective behavioral practitioners while also, and primarily, being good.

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Kxbg4zvfdc] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:683967 -

In this presentation Liz Barnes, Vice Chair of the CIM Charity and Social Marketing Group, will discuss which tactics we should be worried about, which techniques might be considered unethical and ways we can influence and persuade with integrity.

[https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioural-public-policy/article/nudge-forgood/06BC9E9032521954E8325798390A998A] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:279117 -

Insights from the behavioural sciences are increasingly used by governments and other organizations worldwide to ‘nudge’ people to make better decisions. Furthermore, a large philosophical literature has emerged on the ethical considerations on nudging human behaviour that has presented key challenges for the area, but is regularly omitted from discussion of policy design and administration. We present and discuss FORGOOD, an ethics framework that synthesizes the debate on the ethics of nudging in a memorable mnemonic. It suggests that nudgers should consider seven core ethical dimensions: Fairness, Openness, Respect, Goals, Opinions, Options and Delegation. The framework is designed to capture the key considerations in the philosophical debate about nudging human behaviour, while also being accessible for use in a range of public policy settings, as well as training.

[https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3379367] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:253428 -

Consumers, employees, students, and others are often subjected to “sludge”: excessive or unjustified frictions, such as paperwork burdens, that cost time or money; that may make life difficult to navigate; that may be frustrating, stigmatizing, or humiliating; and that might end up depriving people of access to important goods, opportunities, and services. Because of behavioral biases and cognitive scarcity, sludge can have much more harmful effects than private and public institutions anticipate. To protect consumers, investors, employees, and others, firms, universities, and government agencies should regularly conduct Sludge Audits to catalogue the costs of sludge, and to decide when and how to reduce it. Much of human life is unnecessarily sludgy. Sludge often has costs far in excess of benefits, and it can have hurt the most vulnerable members of society.

[https://behavioralscientist.org/broadening-the-nature-of-behavioral-design/?fbclid=IwAR3Tt2zfeGS9feR3KCQgzIGTL5xHZfuUxuLNVN0Ufupq4y8xd-Qurf0qsso] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:245240 -

So what counts as the “right” kind of problem for behavioral science to solve? Put more bluntly: How might our sense about what we should solve, or even what qualifies as a problem worth solving, be biased by how we think about what we can solve?

[https://theconversation.com/government-behavioural-economics-nudge-unit-needs-a-shove-in-a-new-direction-80390] - - public:weinreich
behavior_change, design, ethics - 3 | id:76110 -

In that study, gender and ethnicity information was removed from descriptions of potential job candidates. It was a study designed to interrupt unconscious biases against women and ethnic minorities. The results were surprising - blind recruitment made things worse for women and members of ethnic minorities. These results illustrate the limits of behavioural economics in action.

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